PORT JERVIS, MONTICELLO & NEW YORK RAILROAD COMPANY.

PORT JERVIS, Orange Co., N. Y., May, 1900.

IN PRESENTING this guide to summer tourists, we hope many will be induced to visit the unsurpassed scenery on the line of this road, which they will not regret.
    Leaving New York by the Erie R. R. from West Twenty-third Street, or Chambers Street, Port Jervis is reached quickly, almost before the distance traveled is realized.
    The P. J., M. & N. Y. R. R. connects with the Erie R. R. here. Pullmans run on the midday and through coaches on the evening trains.
    The road has been newly tied, ballasted, and entirely overhauled, and is now in first-class order. New engines, and new passenger coaches.
    The public can rely upon a first-class service and quick transportation, with no delays.
    Sunday trains are run. The schedules of daily trains are so arranged, that patrons can leave on the daily morning train from any of the places on this road and reach New York at 10.30 A. M.
    Good fishing and hunting. Beautiful scenery.
    Good hotels, cool nights, and no mosquitoes; every night necessitating a blanket. No chills.
    Our high altitude is a sure cure for insomnia.
    Come up and see us.
    For further particulars, write

H. J. COX, General Passenger Agent,
Port Jervis, N. Y.

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A DELIGHTFUL COUNTRY.

WHILE this book is mainly intended for summer or temporary visitors, we cannot lose this opportunity to recommend the entire territory of our road to such people as desire to select a permanent residence, or one for at least eight months in the year; friends of nature, seekers of health and repose cannot find more suitable localities. Our mountain-sides teem with picturesque spots where magnificent views can be had over all the surrounding country.
    In the autumn, when the leaves are tinted, our hill-sides are gorgeous in their various hues; then is the time to be in the country, but unfortunately many cannot then spare the time; there is no question, however, the taste for all-year-round country life is growing fast, and to this we appeal.
    Already a number of country clubs and several individuals have seen the beauty of our valleys and have erected club-houses, cottages and residences.
    All tastes can be gratified, and sites utilized on rough boulder-strewn hill-sides, or on level lands in the river bottoms.
    Our highways are the best in the State.
    Riding, driving, boating and all out-door exercise can be had at every hand's turn.
    We are close to the city; we have daily mails, telegraphs and telephones; all necessaries of life can be had good and reasonable.
    The land speculator or boomer has not as yet invaded our territory. Farms are cheap; delightful residence sites can be had for a song.
    If you have a taste for open air, dry as the Colorado Mountains, come to the "Shawangunks," here is your place within one hundred miles of New York.
    This Company will haul for half rates all building material used in construction of new hotels on the line of this road.
    We have no land to sell, but will gladly advise with prospectors.

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THAT REST YOU NEED.

"Wild tracts of forest ground, and scattered groves,
 And mountains bare, or clothed with ancient woods,
 Surrounded us; and as we held our way
 Along the level of the glassy flood,
 They ceased not to surround us; change of place.
 From kindred features diversely combined,
 Producing change of beauty ever new."

THE actual necessity for a summer outing has been established beyond dispute. The growth of the American nation has brought it to an age of the most severe competition, calling forth all the energies of the business and professional man, permeating even into his social life. No matter how pleasant, social amenities are a tax on the strength of wives and daughters. The vitality expended in various pursuits of life, business or social, must be renewed in some way.
    A requisite amount of rest and recreation is a duty you owe to yourself. If you can be induced to invest in the summer outing in a thoroughly practical way, you will readily perceive the balance on the profit side of the account. If experienced, you will testify that more can actually be accomplished in forty-eight or fifty weeks of business effort, with the other two to four weeks spent in recreation, than by close application for the whirling fifty-two weeks of the year. Then, if you too closely apply yourself, you lose the advantage to be gained by a perspective view of your affairs, business or social,

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which can only be had at a distance, with the minor and worrying details removed from the foreground.
    To many who have carefully weighed these points and decided in favor of the recreative change, the task of planning the best way to spend the time is enough to remove the desire for the trip. You know, in a general way, that any change will be beneficial, even if only a change of work; but how can you get the very best results? How often have you seen a neighbor or friend, after arranging for a few weeks, during which the regular employment is laid aside, spend the whole time at home, and go back to the old life without the light step and hearty vigor which characterizes the man who toured, golfed, hunted, or fished, breathing new life, and dollar upon dollar's worth of renewed vitality in the fresh air of the mountains?
    Those who most need recreation are usually the ones to say: "Yes, but I haven't time or knowledge to intelligently plan a trip or select a place to visit." Don't try to. Let some one whose experience has made him competent plan the trip, and submit the plan to you. In a few minutes' time you can point out wherein your case will require different treatment, and let him revise it. Don't you enjoy a dinner better if your hostess takes the matter in her own hands and sets the sumptuous repast before you? If you made the menu, with a thousand other things on your mind, would the repast be so complete?
    For some years many prominent people have regularly written us to plan their summer outing. Every year has brought us a large number of these letters from people in all walks of life. Wide-awake clerks write: "I have $25; want recreation only." Tired stenographers: "I have two weeks, $30 to invest, need rest." Instructors in the schools: "I have plenty of time, not over $40 for traveling expenses, and want first rest--then recreation."
    We account for the growth in numbers of those who write us yearly to the success we have attained in pleasing those who have asked our advice, and this natural growth has awakened us to the realization of the great demand for suggested tours and trips, resulting in this little book.

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MONTICELLO DIVISION THROUGH THE NEVERSINK VALLEY.

LEAVING PORT JERVIS, the road runs easterly through fertile fields and beautiful farms, up the valley of the Neversink River, which here is a limpid silvery stream, reaching

HUGUENOT, Orange County, N. Y.

93 miles from New York.
5 miles from Port Jervis.

Fare from New York $2.50.
Excursion $3.60.
10-Trip Tickets $17.05.

BOARDING HOUSES.

James F. Seybolt. Farm House. Accommodates 12. Rate, $7.00.
James M. Tillman. Accommodates 12. Rate, $7.00.
Mrs. John D. Farrell. Farm House. Accommodates 20. Rate, $7.00.
Mrs. Alfred Griffin. Accommodates 14. Rate, $7.00.
Mrs. Alva Van Etten. Accommodates 12. Rate, $7.00.
Mrs. Cornelius Cuddeback. Accommodates 6. Rate, $7.00.
Mrs. Lewis Cuddeback. Accommodates 8. Rate, $7.00.

    Bicycle riders cannot find better roads. They are fully equal to the celebrated Delaware Water Gap roads, being constructed of the same material (calcareous shale), and are as smooth as a billiard table.
    The good opportunity for bicycle riding has been further improved by the closing of the Delaware & Hudson Canal, thus enabling riders to use the towpath, which formerly was prohibited.
    At Huguenot, one branch of the road runs to Monticello, 20 miles; the other to Summitville, 18 miles distant, where close connections are made with the New York, Ontario & Western Railroad, connecting north and south.
    Leaving Huguenot, running northeast, the next stop reached is Rose Point.

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ROSE POINT.

96 miles from New York.
8 miles from Port Jervis.
Fare from New York $2.75.
Excursion $4.10.

    HERE the great shale banks are located. A picturesque spot. The road, turning in a sharp angle due north, enters the narrow, wild valley of the Neversink River, unsurpassed for its natural grandeur. The road winds around the mountainside, whilst hundreds of feet below, like a silver band, runs the turbulent river, rolling and tossing over boulders and rocks in its mad career to reach the valley.
    We call the special attention of all those who are interested in good roads to the deposits of

CALCAREOUS SHALE.

THE VERY BEST TOP DRESSING MATERIAL FOR STREETS AND HIGHWAYS IN THE WORLD.

    When spread on a proper foundation, a three-ton roller following a sprinkler will produce a billiard-table like surface very quickly.
    It is not liable to heave in winter.
    It dries in a short while, even after the heaviest rain.
    A yard, or three cubit feet, weighs 2,650 pounds.
    An average gondola car holds 25 yards.
    The cheapest way to unload is through coal trestles, as shipments are made in drop-bottom gondolas.
    It is not screened or handled, so is very cheap.
    Sample barrels sent on application.
    We connect with the Erie R. R. and Ontario & Western R. R. and are ready to quote in carload lots to any place.
    Further information will be furnished by applying to the
       PORT JERVIS, MONTICELLO & NEW YORK R. R.

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OAKLAND, Sullivan County, N. Y.

101 miles from New York.
13 miles from Port Jervis.
    Fare from New York $2.90.
Excursion $4.40.

OAKLAND is the next point reached; a romantic village in the valley where the Neversink River and the Bush Kill join, both streams affording excellent trout fishing. The large blue-stone quarries, operated by the North River & Oakland Blue-stone Company, employ many hands the year round, and are of interest to visitors; being located high up in the mountains, they afford a magnificent view over the surrounding country.
    The Beaver Dam is a large canal reservoir, located at the very top of the mountain, and contains many pickerel. We consider this one of the prettiest spots on the line. The Neversink River, which makes a sharp bend to the east here, runs rapidly through narrow, rocky gorges, the steep banks still clad with huge forest trees, which no vandal's hand has as yet defiled, and, may we hope, never will.

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BOARDING HOUSES.

    W. W. CASE. Mountain View House. One-half mile from railroad depot. Accommodates 10. Rates, $5.00 to $7.00 per week. Children, one-third price. Transient rate, $1.00. Discount rates for season guests. Conveyance free. Raise own vegetables. Good fishing and gunning. One-eighth mile from church. Fine location, overlooking the Neversink River. Near post-office. Fine scenery.
    Frank Lane. One-half mile from depot. Accommodates 8. Rates, $5.00 to $7.00 per week.
    James Ketchum. Rose Cottage. 20 rooms. Accommodates 30. Rates on application.
    Elisha R. Case. Pine Cottage. Farm House. One and a-half miles from station. Accommodates 15. Rates, $5.00 to $8.00. Children, $3.00 to $4.00. Conveyance free to season guests. Good fishing and gunning. All kinds of game. Raise own vegetables. One mile from church.

    Splendid and very exciting canoeing and rapid shooting on the Neversink River, the finest in the State.
    Send canoe up two miles tot he Falls of the Neversink at "Hell's Kitchen." Launch your canoe, and the river will do the rest; or shoot the Rapids from Oakland to Port Jervis. This is tamer. The first trip is the grandest run, and perfectly safe to good canoers. Exact data will be furnished by one who made the run many times, by writing specially.
    From here the sharp ascent up the mountains begins. The speed of the train slackens---the grade is one hundred and sixty feet to the mile. We leave the broader valley of the Neversink, clinging tot he abrupt mountain-side, and, running through a wild mountain pass, with the roaring Bush Kill several hundred feet below us, reach Hartwood.


HARTWOOD, Sullivan County, N. Y.

104 miles from New York.
16 miles from Port Jervis.
    Fare from New York $3.00.
Excursion $4.60.

A PRETTY SPOT, with two small lakes immediately adjacent to the railroad. This is the station for the Hartwood Park Club, the members of which are nearly all from New York City, who spend the summer and fall here fishing and hunting. The Association controls ten or twelve thousand acres of wild woodlands.
    A run of two miles brings us to St. Joseph's.

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106 miles from New York.
18 miles from Port Jervis.

ST. JOSEPH'S, Sullivan County, N. Y.


Fare from New York $3.10
Excursion $4.80.

HERE the Railroad Company has erected an artistic rustic depot, constructed of rough stone, to accommodate the growing business of this locality, which consists of the Merriewold Inn, located within two miles, on a pretty sheet of water, surrounded by a number of cottages occupied by New Yorkers, who spend the summer here in the bracing air of the hemlock and pine.

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ST. JOSEPH'S SANITARIUM.

    This extensive property was purchased by the Sisters of St. Dominic in 1896, from the estate of the late Thomas Hunt Talmage, of New York City. It comprises an area of 1,172 acres, 250 of which are at present under cultivation, and what is not occupied by buildings and farm-yards is still thickly wooded. Its situation at a height of 1,947 feet above the level of the sea, makes it one of the most healthful resorts in the State. The scenery of the vicinity is, to say the least, charming. People who have visited it at all seasons always found something new to admire. And as for the air, a better tonic could scarcely be found. It braces up the most delicate person, so that the change is remarkable after a short sojourn there. In a happy speech, which Rt. Rev. Bishop McDonnell, of Brooklyn, made at the opening of the bazaar for the benefit of St. Joseph's Sanitarium, he said that the best advertisement for the invigorating effect of the climate of that locality would be a certain young sister whom he met there during a visit. Her health

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seemed hopelessly shattered. A few months later, while presiding at a religious ceremony at Amityville, the Bishop chanced to meet this same young sister, but so changed was she, that he scarcely knew her. But words fail to describe this beautiful highland region. To fully appreciate it one must go, see, and be conquered.
    The sisters took possession of this property in December, 1896. The summer residence of the late owner, a magnificent structure, served as their temporary abode. This house the Rt. Rev. Bishop dedicated to St. Joseph, whence the name of the Sanitarium is derived. On the same day His Grace, most Rev. Archbishop Corrigan, of New York, sent the sisters a chaplain in the person of Rev. F. Arcese. Several cottages on the premises have been fitted up to accommodate some of the many applicants who wish to spend a few weeks in this delightful retreat. So satisfactory was the result of this small beginning, that it is safe to assume the future success of the sanitarium as assured.

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    Despite the lack of funds, the sisters, trusting to Divine Providence, began to build, May 19, 1897. Ground was broken for five buildings, which were respectively dedicated to Our Lady of Lourdes, St. Dominic, St. Vincent Ferrer, St. Antonina, and St. Rose, of Lima. The corner-stone of the new convent was laid September 12, 1897, by His Grace, the Most Rev. Archbishop Corrigan, in the presence of a number of prominent clergymen. This spacious structure affords ample room for about forty sisters. Attached to it is a large chapel, a gem of its kind. Adjoining this are the apartments for the chaplain.

    Thanks to the untiring activity of all concerned, the work progressed so rapidly that the 17th of March, 1898, saw the sisters installed in their new home. On the 30th of the same month Bishop McDonnell blessed the house and bell. The sisters have opened a boarding school for children of from 6 to 14 years of age. This is a boon for those whose delicate health does not permit them to attend the crowded city schools. Besides having the advantage of a superior education of mind and body here, they are instructed in various

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useful accomplishments. The sisters intend to open an academy for young ladies in this delightful spot. Plans for an industrial school have also been made, and will be carried out, if the sisters are aided in their noble work by charitably disposed persons. The place already boasts a post office, known as St. Joseph's, erected through the efforts of the sisters.

    The rooms are supplied with an abundance of light and ventilation. The accompanying cuts will but imperfectly illustrate what has been said, as the buildings were photographed at a season when the grounds were not yet cleared of debris. A large dam, a model of scientific engineering, has been constructed at St. Joseph's Lake, supplanting the old one, and furnishing sufficient water to light the grounds and buildings with electricity, and a splendid system of arc and incandescent lights have been established throughout. The long distance telephone is here, and the sanitary arrangements of the buildings are perfect. This is a favorite drive, and loads of visitors daily are found here. The convent is five miles from Monticello, over a good road. It is distant two miles from St. Joseph's depot.

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    Although in view of each other, the buildings are a short distance apart, excepting St. Vincent's and St. Antonina's, which are connected by a long corridor. These two are prominently situated on an eminence overlooking the surrounding country. All the latest improvements have been employed to make the institution a success.
    For terms which are very moderate, considering the accommodations, address the Reverend Mother Prioress Antonina, O. S. D., St. Joseph's Sanitarium, Sullivan County, N. Y.

BOARDING HOUSES.

    ANDREW CAMPBELL. Farm House. Post-office address, Merriewold, Sullivan County, New York. 500 feet from station. Accommodates 15. Rates, $6.00 to $7.00 per week. One-half price for children. Transient rates, $1.00 per day. Discount rates for season guests. Conveyance free. Raise own vegetables. Two and one-half miles from church. Good fishing and gunning. References on application. Elevation, 1,600 feet above sea level. Good spring water. No malaria. 7,000 acres of land on which to fish and hunt. Good mailing facilities.
    THOMAS KING. Lake View Farm. Farm House. Two and one-half miles from station. Accommodates 20. Rates, $6.00 to $8.00. Free transportation. Raise own vegetables. Good fishing and gunning. One-half mile from church.
    F. H. Gildersleeve. Gilder Manse. Farm House. Forestburg Post-office. three miles from St. Joseph's Station. Accommodates 12. Rates, $6.00 to $8.00. Free transportation. Raise own vegetables. Several liveries in neighborhood. One mile from Protestant church. One and one-half to two miles from Sister's Chapel, St. Joseph's Sanitarium. Three miles from Mongaup Falls. Good roads. Merriewold Park adjoins property. Distance to County seat, seven miles. Large airy rooms. Shady yard.
    References:-Mr. E. W. Grant, Liberty, N. Y.
          Mr. W. J. Prince, Hurleyville, N. Y.

    After a few miles run, the great plateau of Sullivan County is reached, and the train rolls into Monticello.



MONTICELLO, Sullivan County, N. Y.

112 miles from New York.
24 miles from Port Jervis.
Trains to and from Port Jervis: Week-days, 3; Sundays, 2.
Fare from New York $3.25
Excursion $5.00.
Ten-trip Tickets $21.50.

HERE, at an altitude of 1,700 feet above the ocean, is Monticello, the County seat of Sullivan, and one of the most charming resorts in the State. The village is situated on rolling land, beautifully laid out, with broad, shady streets, and with private residences and grounds exceedingly attractive. It has a population of about 1,800, many of whom are people from New York City and Brooklyn,

29



who have made it a place of permanent residence. From high hills in the immediate vicinity, extensive views of the outlying country may be enjoyed. To the east and northeast the Highlands of the Hudson and the Catskills are plainly visible to the naked eye. In the west are outlined the mountains of Pennsylvania beyond the Delaware Valley. The atmosphere is pure and bracing. Fevers of any kind never originate in this region, and it is particularly beneficial to those afflicted with diseases of a pulmonary nature. Heat never prevents refreshing sleep, and neither dampness nor fog render evening or morning disagreeable. There are trout streams, and the best of bass and pickerel fishing in a number of lakes in the vicinity. Katrina Falls, a picturesque cataract with grand surroundings, Edward's Island in the Neversink, Mongaup Falls, and the beautiful grove bordering the eastern shore of Lake Kiamesha, are among the favorite resorts. Besides the unsurpassed fishing, the autumn season brings abundance of game---partridge, woodcock, and other small game being especially plentiful. Monticello enjoys the proud distinction of having one of the finest water supplies to be found in the State. The crystal waters of Lake Kiamesha are carried to all parts of the village---an inexhaustible supply, pure and healthful. There are Episcopal, Methodist, Presbyterian, and Catholic churches in the village. The educational advantages are of the first order; a graded school with its corps of trained instructors being one of the features of the place. The very best of hotels, and many other attractions might be added to those set forth, to make Monticello not only a summer resort, but a delightful "all-the-year" abode.
    An Annual Coaching Parade is held at the end of August in connection with the Agricultural Fair, which is a very attractive feature, and is visited not only by the local people, but by every summer visitor for miles around, and is quite a feature at the closing of the season.
    Hops alternate in the different hotels nightly.
    A splendid highway has been constructed, running for one mile through the middle of the village, which gives excellent bicycle riding.

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HOTELS AND BOARDING HOUSES.

MONTICELLO AND VICINITY.

MONTICELLO STATION.---Monticello Post-office.

    HOTEL ROCKWELL. George W. Rockwell, proprietor. Accommodates 100. Rates, $10.00 to $12.00. Transient, $2.00. Free Omnibus to all trains. See advertisement, page 66.

    THE FRANK LESLIE. F. L. Ernhout, proprietor. Accommodates 100. Rates on application. See advertisement, page 62.

    Mansion House.

    Bolsom House. Mrs. C. Bolsom, proprietor. Accommodates 40. Rates, $5.00 to $8.00 per week. Transient, $1.00. Conveyance free.

    Monticello House.

    Central House. P. C. Murray, proprietor. Accommodates 35. Rates, $1.00 to $1.50 per day. Steam heat, electric lights, and all sanitary conveniences. Conveyance free.

    Curley House.

    Union House.

    STEPHEN A. REYNOLDS. The Oriental. Accommodates 75. Nineteenth season. Refitted and constantly being improved. Hot and cold water; bath, toilet, and bicycle rooms. First-class livery accommodations. Free transportation. Our illustrated booklet and terms sent on request.

    JAMES PURSELL. Hotel Boarding House. Post-office Box 90. Accommodates 20. Terms on application. No children. Transient, $1.00. Discount for season guests. Raise own vegetables. Good fishing, Kiamesha Lake, White Lake. Good gunning. All kinds of game. Good livery accommodations. About ten minutes' walk to all churches.

    CHARLES H. STAYE. Jefferson House. Lock Box 28. Accommodates 20. Rates, $5.00 to $10.00. Children, $3.00 to $5.00. Transient, $1.25. Raise own vegetables. Near church. References:-W. J. Campbell, M. D., 388 Union Street, Brooklyn, N. Y.

    Mrs. HENRY WEBER. Boarding House. Post-office Box 287. Accommodates 15. Rates, $6.00 to $7.00. Children over 12 years, full price. Transportation, 25 cents.

    E. L. ROYCE. Boarding House. Post-office Box 61. One-quarter mile from station. Accommodates 40. Rates, $6.00 to $10.00. Children, $5.00. Discount for season guests. Omnibus to house. Raise own vegetables. Good livery accommodations. Four churches in sight of house. Good fishing. Lakes Kiamesha, White Lake, and Sackett Lake.

    GEORGE F. GEORGE. St. George Inn. Accommodates 20. Adults $10.00 to $12.00. Children under 10 years half rates. Beautifully located boarding house on stock farm of 205 acres. One and one-half miles from depot. Free transportation. Hunting, fishing, tennis, croquet, piano and games. Own livery, single and double rigs. Saddle ponies. Ten minutes' ride from village churches. Good roads. Anawana, Kiamesha and Sackett Lakes near by. New York City office until June 1st, at 534 West 175th Street. References:-Mark Brennen, San Remo Hotel, Central Park West and 75th St.
                Jos. Brucker, Fairfield Market, 904 Amsterdam Ave., New York.

    ROBERT H. BRADLEY. Boarding House. One-quarter mile from depot. Accommodates 15. Raise own vegetables. Good fishing; bass, pickerel, etc. Good livery accommodation. Nearby church. Terms on application.

    STEPHEN TROWBRIDGE. Boarding House. One-eighth mile from depot. Accommodates 20. Rate, $8.00. Children, $5.00. Transient, $1.50. Discount for season guests. Free transportation. Raise own vegetables. Good fishing. Good livery accommodations. One-half mile from church. References:-H. B. LaMon, 229 East 84th Street, New York City.

    Mrs. SETH S. PELTON. Boarding House. Post-office Box 281. Four and one-half miles from depot. Accommodates 24. $6.00 to $8.00 per week. Children according to age. Transient, $1.00. Raise own vegetables.

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HOTELS AND BOARDING HOUSES.

MONTICELLO AND VICINITY.

Good fishing. Sackett Lake only 700 feet away. Boats free. Good gunning. Croquet and lawn tennis grounds. Also boarding stables for horses.

    JOS. L. REYNOLDS. Boarding House. One-quarter mile from depot. Accommodates 24. Terms on application. Discount to season guests. Transient, $1.50. Free transportation. Raise own vegetables. Good livery accommodations. One-half mile from church. This house has been established for the last 15 years. Sanitary plumbing. Bath and closets in house. Good sewerage. Fresh milk and eggs. Good table.

    Mrs. ALICE STERN. Sunny Side House. Boarding House. One-quarter mile from depot. Accommodates 40. Rates, $8.00 to $12.00. Conveyance, Omnibus. Catholic church in sight on same street. Opens June 1st.

    HIRAM D. JOBE. Farm House. Three miles from station. Accommodates 20. Rates, $5.00 to $7.00. Children according to age. Transient, $1.00. Free transportation. Raise own vegetables. Two miles from church. References on application.

    JOSEPH BAILEY. Farm House. One and one-half miles from station. Accommodates 10. Rates, $5.00 to $7.00. Children half price. Transient, $1.00. Discount to season guests. Transportation one way free, 50 cents. Raise own vegetables. Good fishing---Kiamesha Lake.

    Mr. J. D. KING. Wayside Farm House. Post-office Box 256. Two miles from station. Accommodates 20. Rate, $6. Children according to age. Transient, $1.00. Transportation free. Two miles from church.

    GEORGE W. DECKER. Highland Farm House. Two and one-half miles from station. Accommodates 20. Rates, $7.00 to $9.00.
    References:---Anyone who knows the place.

    D. J. BRANNAN. Farm House. Two miles from station. Accommodates 10. Rates, $5.00 and $6.00. Children according to age. Transient, $1.00. Discount to season guests. Free transportation. Raise own vegetables. Good fishing. First-class livery accommodations. Two miles from church.

    J. B. HOLMES. Farm House. Three and one-half miles from station. Accommodates 16. Rate, $6.00. Children according to age. Transient, $1.00. Transportation free. Raise own vegetables. Trout streams. Good gunning. All kinds of small game. Good livery accommodations. Two miles from church. References on application.

    BYRON CORGILL. Cappocomac Farm. Two miles from station. Accommodates 25. Rates, $7.00 to $8.00. Transportation free. Good livery. Two miles from church. References on application.

    EDWARD F. THOMPSON. Boarding House and Farm. Lock Box 37. One mile from depot. Accommodates 30. Rates, $6.00 to $7.00. Children, $3.00. Transient, $1.25. Discount to season guests. Own livery. Raise own vegetables. Good gunning. Kiamesha and Sackett Lakes. Good fishing. Small game. One mile from church. House is on main road. Sidewalk. Large yard. Good shade. Wide piazza. Good airy rooms. Plenty fresh milk, eggs and butter.
    References:---James McCormack, 340 Third Avenue, New York City.
       Joseph Raczkiewicz, 112 Logan Street, Brooklyn, N. Y.

    Mrs. Margaret Dutcher. Post-office Box 43. Ten adults accommodated. Rates, $7.00 to $10.00 per week. Grounds and shady piazza. Plenty of eggs, milk and poultry. Raise own vegetables.

    B. LaTourette. Boarding House. Ten minutes' walk from depot. Accommodates 30. Rates, $7.00 to $12.00. Children, $5.00. Transient, $1.50. Raise own vegetables. The LaTourette is located on Hamilton Avenue, the most select location in the village. References on application.

    Miss JULIA A. CLARK. House and Barn to rent for season; furnished; or will sell with farm of 115 acres to close estate. Write.

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HOTELS AND BOARDING HOUSES.

MONTICELLO AND VICINITY.

    B. M. LINDSLEY. Two miles from station. Three farms with good houses and barns to sell or rent for the season; furnished or unfurnished. Apply for terms.

    Mrs. JOHN J. VAUGHN. Farm House. Accommodates two small families and four young persons. Rates, $6.50 to $7.00 for adults. Children, half price. Discount rates for season guests. Transportation, 25 cents. Raise own vegetables. Good fishing, Sackett Lake. Ten minutes' walk from church. A new house situated on the hill. Good water, fresh air, and good roads. A short distance from village.

    WALTER HARDWICK. Boarding House. One-eighth mile from station. Accommodates 20. Rates for adults, $8.00 to $10.00. Children, $4.00 to $6.00. Discount rates for season guests. Raise own vegetables. Good fishing and gunning. Good livery accommodations. Three hundred feet from church. Special attention paid to hunters.
    References on application.

    Hiram Towner. Accommodates 100. Rate, $9.00. Three miles from depot.

    C. G. Royce. Orchard Grove House. Accommodates 50. Rates, $7.00 to $10.00. Conveyance free.

    Mrs. A. N. Olmsted. Hill Farm. Accommodates 15. Rate, $5.00. Conveyance free.

    Mrs. Ira Mapledoram. Accommodates 20. Rate, $6.00. One-eighth mile from depot.

    Mrs. A. W. Vail. Vail Cottage. Accommodates 12. Rate, $6.00. Children, $3.00. Discount for season. Conveyance free. Fruit, own vegetables. Livery. Hunting. Pleasant home.

    George C. Smith. Western View Farm. Accommodates 20. Rates, $5.00 to $7.00. Conveyance free. Two miles from depot. Good hunting and fishing.

    Mrs. Owen Lewis. Saginaw Cottage. Accommodates 35. Rates, $7.00 to $10.00. Conveyance free. One mile from depot. No small children taken.

    Wm. J. Bolsom. Locust Cottage. Accommodates 10. Rates on application. One-half mile from depot.

    John D. King. Wayside Farm. Accommodates 20. Rates, $6.00 to $8.00. Conveyance free. Two miles from depot.

    Thomas King. Lake View House. Accommodates 20. Rates on application. Conveyance free. Four miles from depot. Good hunting and fishing.

    A. Dunn. Sunrise Cottage. Accommodates 10. Rates, $6.00 to $8.00. Conveyance free. Also furnished cottage to rent for season.

    Mrs. M. D. Wilson and Miss M. M. Waring. Rates on application. Conveyance free. Clean, cool, neatly furnished rooms. A good table.

    Fred. Flambard. The Manhassett. Accommodates 20. Rates, $6.00 to $8.00. Children half price. High ground. Plenty of shade. Cuisine first-class.

    M. A. Daudt. Maple Lawn House. Accommodates 12. Rates, $5.00. Transportation according to party. Five miles from depot.

    Miss E. Osborn. Osborn Cottage. Accommodates 40. Rates on application.

    John Hagan. Accommodates 20. Rate, $6.00. Conveyance free.

    Mrs. M. A. Towner. Towner Villa. Accommodates 30. Rates, $8.00 to $12.00.

    George Roxbury. Ratcliffe Park Hotel. Accommodates 30. Rates, $7.00 to $10.00. Conveyance free.

    Miss E. G. Ives. Accommodates 25. Large grounds. Fine shady piazza. Airy rooms. Home comforts and good table. Located on finest avenue in Monticello. Rates, $7.00 to $10.00.

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HOTELS AND BOARDING HOUSES.

MONTICELLO AND VICINITY.

    Evans' Villa. L. Evans, proprietor. Accommodates 35 to 40. Croquet and tennis grounds. Vegetables and poultry raised on the place. Rates on application.

Charles E. Kent.
Mrs. Alice Green.
Mrs. L. Kinne.
Miss M. A. Whittaker.
Mrs. Charles Ennis.
Mrs. P. M. Avery.
Mrs. W. L. Willetts.
George Hill.
Mrs. Daniel Mapledoram.
Mrs. M. Bowman.
Mrs. George W. Kinne.
Mrs. John D. Carpenter.
S. M. Jordan.
Mrs. J. D. O'Neil.
Mrs. William Brice.
Thomas Clavin.
Mrs. D. L. Decker.
Isaac O. Smith.
M. Toohey.
A. R. Crandall.
Asa Hunter.
B. M. Lindsley.
Daniel Parish.
John Hill.
Mrs. M. C. Stage.
Mrs. S. H. Royce.
D. L. Krum.
R. H. Hall.
G. B. Watts.
Eugene Hifton.
C. K. Benedict.
D. W. Avery.

MONTICELLO STATION--Thompsonville Post-office.

    G. B. WATTS. Farm House. Three and one-half miles from station. Accommodates 35. Rates, $6.00 to $7.00. Children, $3.00. Transient, $1.00. Discount for season guests. Transportation free. Raise own vegetables. Good fishing; trout, bass and pickerel. Good gunning; partridges and rabbits. Good livery accommodations.

------------------

MONTICELLO STATION--Maplewood Post-office.

    DAVID CARLISLE. Farm House. Three miles from station. Accommodates 15 or 20. Terms on application. Free transportation. Raise own vegetables. Two miles from church.

    JOHN HILL. Maplewood House. Three miles from Monticello station. Accommodates 35. Terms on application. Good livery accommodations. Reference:--Mr. Alexander Ferris, 631 Quincy Street, Brooklyn N. Y., and 45 to 51 Rose Street, New York City, N. Y.



LAKE KIAMESHA.

Post-office and Railroad Station, Monticello, N. Y., one and a-half miles from Lake.

LAKE KIAMESHA, situated about one and a-half miles from Monticello, is one of the most beautiful sheets of water in Sullivan County. On its eastern shore it is wooded to the water's edge, and through this beautiful forest of oak and pine there is a splendid winding drive, as well as innumerable walks over the soft turf and green moss, from which, through the trees, can be seen glimpses of the clean, calm waters of the lake. Ferns and laurels add to the delicious coolness of this beautiful natural park. On the northern shore is the Kiamesha Lake House, and all around the lake are cottages and boarding places, at which boats may be secured for a row on this lovely sheet of water. On the western and southern shores the landscapes are magnificent; the ground rises in gentle, undulating slopes. Handsome cottages and beautiful residences are continually springing up. All around the lake and close to its limpid and sparkling water is a road on which wheelmen and horsemen may drink in the most delightful views, and in the hottest weather may taste the sweet coolness of Kiamesha Lake.

BOARDING HOUSES.

MONTICELLO STATION.---Monticello Post-office.

    LAKE VIEW COTTAGE. J. H. Millspaugh, proprietor. Accommodates 40. Rates, $8.00 to $10.00. Two and a-half miles from Monticello. Fine view of surrounding country, shady lawns, croquet ground, etc., etc.

    KIAMESHA VILLA. J. H. Taylor, proprietor. Accommodates 75. Rates, $7.00 to $10.00. Transients, $2.00. Baths and sanitary improvements. Free conveyance one way to season guests. Raise own vegetables. Croquet and lawn tennis grounds. First-class livery; boating and fishing. Send for circular.

    W. J. TROWBRIDGE.

    JOHN CONWAY.

    KIAMESHA LAKE HOUSE.

    LAKESIDE INN. W. H. Winne, proprietor. One and a-half miles form Monticello. Accommodates 50. Rates, $7.00 to 8.00.

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MONTICELLO, and the surrounding country, offering as it does so many advantages to the summer sojourner, it may not be amiss to put before the angler and gunner in a few words what he may expect to secure if he has the time and inclination to go in this section in search of spoils. In the fall, woodcock, partridge, rabbits, and other small game are abundant. "Speckled beauties," bass, and pickerel can be secured also. No one ever comes away empty-handed, and good bags are the rule, not the exception. Larger game---deer, bear, foxes, wildcats, etc., do not run down the main street, but are frequently shot a few miles outside of the village. The autumn months are particularly pleasant in Sullivan County, and a day's shoot cannot fail to be helpful in many ways, without taking in account a deer, a good bag of partridges, or rabbits to show friends who have not the good fortune to be able to spend a few days in glorious Sullivan County.

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From New York Sun, March 19, 1898.

Port Jervis Evening Gazette, November 13th, 1899.

THE PRESIDENT HUNTS WITH A TRAIN.

    A peculiar incident happened on the Port Jervis, Monticello & New York Railroad Friday last. The President went up the road on Conductor Baker's freight train Friday forenoon, and as usual stood on the hind end of the train overlooking the track, when near St. Joseph's both he and Conductor Baker discovered a fluttering object in the middle of the track, both being keen sportsmen, at once saw it was a wounded ruffed grouse, and in a second the President told the conductor to stop the train and "retrieve" the bird. This was quickly accomplished, the engineer jumped off his engine, ran back and anxiously inquired what he had struck, his conscience was bad, as several unfortunate cows had been sent to their happy ends lately. The President laughingly replied, "You struck my dinner," and as a fact, the locomotive struck a flying grouse as it crossed the track. We believe this is the first time a railroad President went hunting with a freight train, but it is a fact.

From New York Sun, Feb. 3, 1899.

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WHITE LAKE, Sullivan County, N. Y.

120 miles from New York.
8 miles from Monticello.

To New York and Return the Same Day, with Five Hours in the City for Business or Pleasure. Two Stages Each Way Week-days; One Each
Way on Sundays. Fare from New York, Excursion, $6.50; Ten-Trip Tickets between New York and Monticello, $21.50.
Stage Line Tickets between Monticello and White Lake can be procured of the Conductor at $1.00 Each.

"Abrupt and sheer the mountains sink
At once upon the level brink,
With just a trace of silver sand
Marks where the water meets the land."

THE drive from Monticello to White Lake is one of the features of the trip. Mountain stages meet all trains at Monticello, and the road leads over hills by easy grades; the views en route are varied and grand.
    White Lake is a beautiful sheet of pure, clear water. It is the deepest lake in the county; actual measurement at the northern end gives a depth of 80 feet, and the narrows 70 feet. No one who has not visited White Lake can appreciate the attractive loveliness of this place. Magnificent views can be had from the surrounding hills. The lake slumbering beneath, when dotted with boats, presents a sight which one never tires of seeing. Here, indeed, one may secure the undisturbed repose calculated to please those who relish retirement from the busy scenes of active life. To crown all, here is an atmosphere as delightful as any on the globe, so that those who wish to combine rare scenery with healthfulness of climate, will find a summer sojourn in this vicinity most beneficial. The high altitude renders the vicinity of White Lake cool and breezy; many cases can

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be cited of the rapid recovery of those suffering from malarial and pulmonary disorders. The lake has been recently stocked with bass, and the favorite sport of black bass fishing is now one of the attractions; bass weighing five and six pounds are frequently taken. Connected with White Lake by a channel is Amber Lake. The peculiar charm of this lake is its absolute seclusion. The primitive woods shut in and surround it on every side, so that nothing but primeval nature can be seen.



HOTELS AND BOARDING HOUSES.

MONTICELLO STATION.
WHITE LAKE.
WHITE LAKE POST-OFFICE.

    J. P. KINNE & CO. Summer Hotel. Eight miles from station. Accommodates 125. Rates on application. Stage fare, $1.00. Good cedar boats at moderate rates. Good livery accommodations. One mile to church. Other amusements, as boating, bathing, base-ball, tennis, golf, etc.
    ROBERT L. JONES. "Hotel Jones." Eight miles from station. Accommodates 15. Adults, $7.00 to $8.00. Children, $4.00 to $5.00. Transient, $1.50. Livery connected with Hotel. One-half block to church. Hotel, Ice-Cream Parlor and Restaurant. Lunches at all hours. Gentlemen preferred. Will run stage line during season 1900, between Monticello and White Lake.
    JOHN R. MERCER. Far View Boarding House. Accommodates 16. Adults, $7.00. Children, $3.50. Transient, $1.25. Livery and stages. Good fishing, White Lake; all kinds of fish. Good gunning; birds, partridges, deer, etc. One-eighth mile to church.
    JAMES CALLBREATH. Lakeside House. The Lakeside House is situated on the South Shore of the Lake, and commands an unexcelled view of the waters. The house is large and roomy, with spacious verandas, and is surrounded by large shade trees. A shady lawn, extending to the shore, is around the house, with hammocks and settees, making a cool and picturesque spot. Good livery connected, and proprietor has many boats on lake. The lawn is terraced on shore, and a large dock extends out several feet into the water. There are accommodations for 60 guests.
    Mrs. M. A. B. WADDELL, Sunny Glade House. Eight miles from station. Accommodates 30. Adults, $8.00 to $12.00. Reduction for children. Transportation, stage or livery. Good fishing. Church next door. Well-known for thirty years, and approved by its refined patrons.
    ISABEL MERCER. Hill Side Cottage. Boarding House. Eight miles from station. Accommodates 18. Adults, $6.00 to $7.00. Children, $4.00. Transient, $1.00. Discount to season guests. Stage transportation. Raise own vegetables. Good fishing and gunning. All kinds of game. Very near to church.
    E. G. NEWKIRK. Balsam House. Eight miles from station. Accommodates 75. Adults, $7.00 to $9.00. Children, $4.00. Transient, $1.50. Discount to season guests. Stage transportation. Raise own vegetables. Good fishing. Good livery accommodations. One-eighth mile to church. References on application.
    W. CHESTER KINNE. Prospect House. Eight miles from station. Accommodates 125. Stage transportation. Raise own vegetables. Good fishing: trout, bass, pickerel, etc. Have our own boats at reasonable rentals. Good gunning; partridge, deer, rabbits, squirrels, foxes, etc. Good livery accommodations. Five minutes' to church. Rates on application. References on application. Three sightly cottages. Amusement hall. Large piazzas. Baths, hot and cold water; best sanitary plumbing. Lake shore forest 50 acres, on farm of 150 acres. Golf links, etc.
    J. B. LOW. Hotel Low. Formerly Hotel Maine. Eight miles form Monticello station. Accommodates 40 to 50. Rates for adults, $6.00 to $8.00. Children, half price. Discount rates for season guests. Transportation, public stage or private conveyance. Good fishing and gunning. Near White Lake, Black Lake, and others. Partridge, woodcock, rabbits, foxes, and other small game. First-class livery accommodations. Ten minutes' walk from church. References:--Wm. Browne, 520 West 20th Street, N. Y., J. Coffee, 33 Flatbush Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y.
    E. J. BROWNE. Boarding House. Eight miles from Monticello. Accommodates 20. Rates on application. Discount rates for season guests. Transportation by stage. Raise own vegetables. Good fishing. Ten minutes' walk from church.
    THE ARLINGTON. R. J. Nellis, proprietor. Accommodates 160. Rates on application. See advertisement, page 62.
    W. J. Mercer. Highland Farm House. Eight miles from station. Accommodates 15. Rates for adults, $5.00 and $6.00. Children, $3.00. Transient, $1.00. Transportation for season guests, free. Others, $1.00. Five minutes' walk to lake and Post-office. Free wagon to church.

Grand Central Hotel.
White Lake Farm House.
Brooks' Farm Cottage.
"Edgemere." J. M. Dubarry.
Ramsey House.
West Shore Hotel.
Lake View House.
Pleasant View Cottage.
White Lake House.
The Kauneonga.
Park Hotel.
The Columbia.
Van Morstein Villa.
Sylvan Grove House.
The Kensington.
Van Wert House.
Sportsmen's Home.
Laurel House.
Rogers' House.
Hotel Fulton.
Lakewood Cottage.
Hoffman House.
The Cottages.
Wm. Brown.

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SUMMITVILLE DIVISION, "Through the Mamakating Valley."

MAKING close connections at Summitville with the New York, Ontario & Western Railroad trains for New York, and all north-bound trains. Situated partly in Orange and partly in Sullivan Counties, running due east and west. It was first settled by the Dutch and Huguenots, the descendants of which are still to be found in nearly all the farms throughout the valley. The roads are excellent, affording good driving and bicycling. Nearly every farm house takes summer boarders, and travelers have the choice of both our connections---either the Erie R. R., at Port Jervis, or the New York, Ontario & Western R. R., via Summitville.
    Through this valley runs one of the oldest highways in the State; a continuation of the "King's Highway," running from Kingston on the Hudson to Philadelphia. The old Dutch settlers as far back as 1620, built this road originally to carry out the product of mysterious mines said to have been located in the Shawangunk Mountains; the road was then called the "Peenpack Trail." The hallucinations of hidden wealth in these then wild wood-lands caused many grievous disappointments when the so-called valuable ores were submitted to the crucible; they turned out to be pyrites or "fools' gold;" yet fairy tales of the "lost mine" are still heard. However lead has been mined extensively near Wurtsboro, and the old smelting plant, shafts, etc., can yet be seen.
    The main stream intersecting the valley is "Basha Kill;" some historians claim it is a corruption of the Dutch of "Betje" or "Elizabeth." Others, more romantically inclined, claim it took its name from the Indian Chieftainess "Basha Bashiba," of the "Lena Lenapes," one of the branches of the great tribe of the "Delawares," whose hunting ground was in this valley, which is said to have literally swarmed with turkey, deer, bear and all kinds of fish. Even to this late day it offers a great field to sportsmen. The "Kill" is navigable for canoes everywhere, and offers a good day's sport even to the timid.

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GODEFFROY'S, Orange County, N. Y.

95 miles from New York.
7 miles from Port Jervis.
Fare from New York, $2.70.
Excursion, $4.00.

A SMALL hamlet of about fifty inhabitants, situate on the now-abandoned Delaware & Hudson Canal and the intersection of the highway from Guymard over the Shawangunk Mountains.
    Here are the great dams erected by the State to curb the over-flows of the turbulent Neversink River. Close by here the "Basha Kill" joins the Neversink River, and the road, crossing a two hundred foot span steel bridge and running through a level country, reaches

CUDDEBACKVILLE, Orange County, N. Y.

97 miles from New York.
9 miles from Port Jervis.
Fare from New York, $2.75.
Excursion, $4.10.

A VILLAGE of 150 inhabitants, with a Dutch Reformed Church and a good hotel. The "Basha Kill" flows within a quarter of a mile, and affords good boating and fishing, bass and trout being quite plentiful.

HOTEL AND BOARDING HOUSES.

    Hotel Cuddeback. Levi Cuddeback. One-quarter of a mile from station. Accommodates 50. Rates, $7.00 to $10.00 per week. Half rates for children. Transient rates, $1.00 to $1.50 per day. Five minutes' walk from church.

    James Cuddeback. Maple Farm. One-half mile from station. Accommodates 8. Rates, $6.00 to $7.00 per week. Transient, $1.00 per day. Conveyance free. Raise own vegetables. One-half mile from church.

    E. Stidd. Neversink Farm. One-half mile from station. Accommodates 12. Rates, $6.00 to $8.00 per week. Children, $3.00 to $4.00. Transient rates, $1.00 to $1.25 per day. Conveyance free. Raise own vegetables. One-half mile from church.

    Chris. Kiernan. One-half mile from station. Accommodates 8. Rate, $5.00 per week. Children, half price. Transient rates, $1.00. Conveyance free. Raise own vegetables. One-eighth mile from church.

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PORT ORANGE, Orange County, N. Y.

104 miles from New York.
11 miles from Port Jervis.
Fare from New York $2.26.

A HAMLET on the "Basha Kill." The main interest is the large creamery of Messrs. Kiernan Bros., of 872 Amsterdam Avenue, New York, who derive part of their milk supply from here.

BOARDING HOUSES.

    CYRUS SKINNER. Farm House. Post-office address, Cuddebackville, Orange County, New York. One mile from station. Accommodates 10. Rates, $4.00 to $7.00 per week. Children, $3.00 to $4.00. Discount rates for season guests. Conveyance free. Raise own vegetables. Good fishing and gunning. Two miles from church.

    Jacob Weingartner. Post-office address, Cuddebackville, Orange Co., New York. One mile from station. Accommodates 60. Rates, $6.00 to $7.00 per week.

    Michael Kiernan. Farm House. Post-office address, Westbrookville, New York. 200 feet from railroad station. Accommodates 6. Rate, $5.00 per week. Conveyance free. Raise own vegetables. One mile from church.

WESTBROOKVILLE, Sullivan County, N. Y.

103 miles from New York.
12 miles from Port Jervis.
Fare from New York $2.20.

IS ANOTHER small village situated on the canal, and only a short distance from the "Basha Kill." It makes a specialty of accommodating summer boarders, the vicinity being full of lively brooks with good trout fishing, and lakes; as "Yankee," "Wolf," and "Panther" Ponds, which abound in bass and pickerel. Pine Kill is particularly recommended.

BOARDING HOUSES.

    Isaac Cuddeback. One-half mile from station. Accommodates 36. Rate $6.00 per week.
    Mrs. S. W. Skinner. Farm House. One-eighth mile from station. Accommodates 26. Rates, $5.00 to $7.00 per week. Children, one-half price. Transient, $1.00 per day. Conveyance free. Raise own vegetables. One-eighth mile from church.
    Mrs. W. A. Moore. One-eighth mile from station. Accommodates 8. Rate, $5.00 per week. Children, half-price. One-quarter mile from church.
    Joseph Snyder. Farm House. One and one-half miles from station. Accommodates 10. Rate, $6.00 per week. Children, one-half price. Transient, $1.00 per day. Conveyance free. Raise own vegetables. One and one-half miles from church.

57



    Frank Pierce. Farm House. Two miles from station. Accommodates 25. Rates, $5.00 to $7.00 per week. Children, one-half price. Transient, $1.00 per day. Raise own vegetables. Good gunning and fishing. Two miles from church.

    David Rhodes. Farm House. Two miles from station. Accommodates 25. Rates, $6.00 to $7.00 per week. Children, one-half price. Transient, $1.00 per day. Raise own vegetables. Good gunning and fishing. Two miles from church.

    Abram Healey. "Oak Brook Cottage." Two miles from station. Accommodates 30. Rate, $5.00 per week. Children, one-half price. Transient, $1.00 per day. Conveyance free. Raise own vegetables. Good fishing. Two miles from church.

BROWNVILLE, Sullivan County, N. Y.

A FLAG-STATION immediately adjacent to the highway which here crosses the "Basha Kill" for Haven Post-office or Brownville on the west side of the valley.

BOARDING HOUSES.

    Case, Caskey & Son. Maple Grove Farm. Post-office address, Haven, Sullivan Co., N. Y. Three-quarter's of a mile from station. Accommodates 10. Rate, $7.00 per week. Transient, $1.00 per day. Discount rates for season guests. Conveyance free. Raise own vegetables. Good fishing and gunning. Boats free to guests. Two and one-half miles from church.

    Arthur Grimes. Post-office address, Haven, Sullivan Co., N. Y. Accommodates 18. Rates, $6.00 to $7.00 per week.

    Elijah Smith. Post-office address, Haven, Sullivan Co., N. Y. Accommodates 18. Rates, $5.00 to $7.00 per week.

WURTSBORO, Sullivan County, N. Y.

97 miles from New York.
18 miles from Port Jervis.
Fare from New York $1.90.

IS QUITE a village, and boasts of 500 inhabitants, three good hotels, plenty of cottages and boarding houses. From here the formerly famous Newburgh and Cochecton turnpike runs to Monticello, affording a beautiful drive, with varying scenery of mountain, brook and lakes, of which are "Lord" and "Masten," covering a large area and affording excellent fishing. The village derives its name from the two brothers Wurts, of Philadelphia, who were the promoters and originators of the present Canal.

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    Washington Irving wrote in 1884 when he visited here in company with Vice-President Van Buren:

    The traveler who sets out in the morning from the beautiful village of Bloomingburgh, to pursue his journey westward, soon finds himself, by an easy ascent, on the summit of the Shawangunk. Before him will generally be spread an ocean of mist, enveloping and concealing from his view the deep valley and lovely village which lie almost beneath his feet. If he reposes here for a short time, until the vapors are attenuated and broken by the rays of the morning sun, he is astonished to see the abyss before him deepening and opening on his vision. At length, far down in the newly revealed region, the sharp, white spire of a village-church is seen, piercing the incumbent cloud; and, as the day advances a village, with its ranges of bright-colored houses and animated streets, is revealed to the admiring eye. So strange is the process of its development, and so much are the houses diminished by the depth of the ravine, that the traveler can scarcely believe he is not beholding phantoms of fairy land, or still ranging in those wonderful regions which are unlocked to the mind's eye by the wand of the god of dreams. But as he decends the western declivity of the mountain, the din of real life rises to greet his ear, and he soon pentrates into the midst of the ancient settlements."

    A mile west of here is the grave of Manuel Gansalus, the first white settler in Sullivan County; a rough head-stone bears this inscription:

    He was a Spanish nobleman who had embraced the Protestant faith and had to flee his country to escape persecution.
    Opposite this historic spot is the famous Indian Council Rock, totally inaccessible except by a hidden rock-hewn path leading to the level top, where the sachems are reported to have held their meetings and esteemed it a sacred spot.

HOTELS.

    S. ADELAIDE OLCOTT. Olcott Hotel. One-half mile from station. Accommodates 60. Rates, $6.00 to $7.00 per week. Children, according to age. Transient, $1.50 per day. Discount rates for season guests. References on application. Conveyance free to season guests. Raise own vegetables. Good fishing. Five lakes from three to five miles from depot:---

60


Yankee, Masten, Lords, Wolf, and Panther Lakes. Good gunning. Three churches within five minutes' walk. Hotel is centrally located, commanding a fine view of the Shawangunk Mountains and Mamakating Valley.

    FRANK McCUNE. Dorrance Hotel. One-quarter mile from station. Accommodates 50. Rates, $7.00 to $10.00 per week. Children, $7.00 per week. Transient rates, $2.00 per day. References on application. Conveyance free. Raise own vegetables. Good fishing. Masten and Yankee Lakes. Good gunning. Most all kinds of small game. Church near by.

    Thomas Dubois. Commercial Hotel. One-quarter mile from station. Accommodates 15. Rate, $6.00 per week.

    Mrs. C. C. Nelson. Hotel Munn. Three miles from station. Accommodates 25. Rates. $6.00 to $8.00 per week. Children, half price. Transient, $1.50 per day. Discount rates for season guests. Conveyance, 50 cents. Raise own vegetables. Good fishing. Good livery accommodations. Two and one-half miles form church.

BOARDING HOUSES.

    J. W. PARSELLS. The Glen. Three-quarter's of a mile from station. Accommodates 20. Rate, $6.00 per week. Transient, $1.25 per day. References on application. Raise own vegetables. Good fishing and gunning. Good livery accommodations. Five minutes' walk from church. Good sanitary conditions. High elevation. Good mailing facilities.

    Henry R. Leigh. Two miles from station. Accommodates 15. Rates, $6.00 to $7.00 per week.

    H. R. Philcox. Walnut Villa. Two miles from station. Accommodates 25. Rates, $6.00 to $8.00 per week. Transient, $1.50 per day. Discount rates for season guests.

    C. E. Bullard. One-quarter mile from station. Accommodates 10. Rate, $7.00 per week.

    Mrs. Edith Van Kuran. Private House. One-quarter mile from station. Accommodates 16. Rate, $6.00 per week. Children, according to age. Transient, $1.50 per day. Discount rates for season guests. Raise own vegetables. Near three churches.

    W. H. Anderson. Mountain Brook Farm. One mile from station. Accommodates 12. Rate, $6.00 per week. Children, $5.00.

    Mrs. Joseph Brown. One-quarter mile from station. Accommodates 6. Rates, $6.00 to $7.00 per week. Children, half price. Discount rates for season guests. Raise own vegetables. Good fishing and gunning. Near by three churches.

    Mrs. Mary E. Morris. One-quarter mile from station. Accommodates 12. Rates, $5.00 to $6.00 per week. Children, half price. Transient, $1.00 per day. Raise own vegetables.

    Mrs. Alex. Brown. One-quarter mile from station. Accommodates 10. Rates, $6.00 to $7.00 per week. Children, half price. Raise own vegetables. Good fishing.

    Wm. Clark. Overlook Farm. Three-quarter's of a mile from station. Accommodates 15. Rate, $6.00 per week. Transient, $1.00 per day. Raise own vegetables. Five minutes' walk from church.

    T. V. Masten. One-quarter mile from station. Accommodates 12. Rate, $7.00 per week.

    Patrick McElroy. One-quarter mile from station. Accommodates 6. Rate, $6.00 per week. Children, $4.00.

    Mrs. G. H. Schoonmaker. One-quarter mile from station. Accommodates 15. Rates, $6.00 to $8.00 per week.

    Chauncey B. Newkirk. One-half mile from station. Accommodates 60. Rates, $6.00 to $8.00 per week. Children, $4.00. Transient, $1.50 per day. Discount rates for season guests.

    Mrs. A. D. Tice. One-half mile from station. Accommodates 10. Rates, $6.00 to $7.00 per week.

    Mrs. M. J. Morris. One-quarter mile from station. Accommodates 10. Rates, $6.00 to $7.00 per week. Children, half price.

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