B


    JOHN H. BABB is another of the native sons of Richland county who has here attained to pronounced success in connection with the great basic industry of agriculture, being one of the prominent and representative farmers and sock-growers of Sylvan township. He is a progressive and public-spirited citizen and has had the distinction of representing his county in the state legislature. Mr. Babb was born on the old homestead farm, in Sylvan township, Aug. 10, 1860, and is a son of George H. and Elizabeth E. (Jordon) Babb, the former of whom was born in Ohio, Oct. 25, 1815, and the latter of whom was born in Indiana, Mar. 9, 1823. The father of George H. Babb was born in Virginia and his mother in Pennsylvania, and the former's father came to America from Germany and his mother from Wales. Elizabeth E. (Jordon) Babb's father was born in Ireland and her mother in Virginia. The parents of the subject of this sketch came from Indiana to Wisconsin in 1856 and became numbered among the pioneers of Richland county. The father secures 160 acres of government land, reclaiming the same from the virgin forest, and thereafter he bought and sold several other tracts, having sold all his landed interests at the time of his death, which occurred on his original homestead, in Sylvan township. He identified himself with the Republican party at the time of its organization and both he and his wife were devout and zealous members of the Christian, or Disciples', church, in which he was a licensed preacher. He was one of the pioneer ministers of this county, and also taught school at intervals, having been a man of strong intellectual powers and having had a high sense of his stewardship in all the relations of life. Of the eleven children in his family the following record in given: Nancy J. is the wife of David Smith, of this county; Susan Ann is deceased; Timothy S. resides in Colorado; Charles N. is deceased; Margaret A. is the wife of Henry Benn and the reside at Viola, Vernon; William H. is a resident of Lawrence, Kan.; Rachel L. is deceased; Elisha E. is a farmer of Sylvan township; the subject of this review was the next in order of birth; James D. is deceased; and Ida B. is the wife of Douglas M. Cranston, of Viola. John H. Babb was reared to manhood in Sylvan township, his early training being that of the pioneer farm and educational advantages those of the district schools. At the age of twenty-one years he began working by the month, as a farm hand, thus continuing until he had attained to the age of twenty-four years, when he engaged in teaching in the district schools, proving most successful in his pedagogic efforts, which he continued about three years. He then became associated with his brother James in the purchasing of eighty acres of timbered land, in Sylvan township, and they reclaimed the tract to cultivation, owning the same jointly until the death of his brother, in January, 1906, and also having accumulated other lands. Mr. Babb now owns a finely improved landed estate of 200 acres and he gives his attention to diversified agriculture and to the raising of excellent grades of live stock. In politics Mr. Babb is aligned as a stanch advocate of the principles and policies of the Republican party and he is prominent in connection with local affairs of a public nature, having served four years as county treasurer and having been elected to the state legislature in 1901, serving one term as representative of his county in the assembly. He hold membership in the Knights of Pythias and his religious views are in harmony with the tenets of the Christian church, in whose faith he was reared. July 4, 1900, Mr. Babb was united in marriage to Miss Jessie M. Danner, daughter of Richard A. and Mahala (Keys) Danner, the former of whom was born in Ohio and the latter in Indiana. In the latter state Mrs. Babb was born, Jan. 12, 1868, and in 1870 her parents removed thence to Richland county, Wisconsin, settling in Marshall township, where they passed the remainder of their lives, the mother having passed away in 1894 and the father in 1900. They are survived by six children. Mr. and Mrs. Babb have four children, whose names and respective dates of birth are as follows: Madaline M., April 4, 1902; George E., Nov. 14, 1903; Bernard G., Aug. 12, 1904; and an infant, March 9, 1906.
    GEORGE H. BAILEY is one of the substantial farmers of Richland county, where he has lived from his childhood days except for brief intervals, and he is now the owner of a fine farm on 200 acres, lying partly in Sylvan and partly in Akan townships. Mr. Bailey was born in Meigs county, Ohio, July 27, 1853, and is a son of William and Lydia (Blackledge) Bailey, both likewise native of the old Buckeye State, where the former was born Feb. 4, 1826 and the latter July 29, 1927. The father died March 3, 1865, and his widow long survived him, her death occurring Feb. 14, 1890. Their marriage was solemnized in 1847, and the continued to reside in Ohio until 1853, when they came to Richland county, where the father purchased 200 acres of heavily timbered land, in Marshall township. He cleared about thirty-five acres of the tract before his death. In 1862 he enlisted in Company B, Twentieth Wisconsin volunteer infantry, being made corporal in his company and proceeding to the front with his command. He took part in a number of battles and skirmishes and remained in the service until 1864, when he was discharged, by reason of physical disability. He never regained his health, being thereafter practically an invalid until his death, in March of the following year. He was a man of ability and sterling character and was a citizen who commanded unqualified esteem. In politics he identified with the Republican party at the time of its organization, being a stanch supporter of its cause. His wife was a birth right member of the Society of Friends and manifested her faith in her gentle and gracious character. This worthy couple became the parents of five children: Wiatt L. is now living in Missouri; Wilson J. is a resident of Iowa; the subject of this review was the next in order of birth; Quincy A. is deceased; and Veleda is the wife of Joseph Armstong, of Rockbridge township. George H. Bailey was reared to maturity in Richland county, where he attended the district schools at irregular intervals, early beginning to depend largely upon his own resources. At the age of thirteen years he found employment by the month at farm work, and he continued thus engaged until he had attained to the age of twenty-two years, when he purchased eighty acres of land in Vernon county, where he remained one year, then disposing of the property and returning to Richland county. He bought the interests of the other heir to the old homestead, in Marshall township, but sold the place two years later and purchased forty acres in Sylvan township. Since that time he has made several sales and purchases of land in Sylvan and Akan townships, now having 200 acres, as previously stated. He is engaged in diversified agriculture and devotes considerable attention to dairying, having a herd of about fifty cattle and supplies a large amount of milk to the local creamery. In all matters of local import he takes a deep interest, showing a loyal and liberal spirit. In politics he is a supporter of the Republican party, and he has frequently been a delegate to the county conventions. He has served as a member of the town board and has held various school offices, including that of clerk of his district. He has frequently been summoned as a juror in the county and Federal courts and is a citizen to whom is accorded the fullest measure of popular confidence and esteem. In a fraternal way he is identified with Dayton Lodge, No. 213, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of which his elder son also is a member. Oct. 9, 1864, Mr. Bailey was united in marriage to Miss Ida A. Brott, daughter of William and Elvira (Orringer) Brott, the former of whom died in New York state and the latter of whom now resides in the home of the subject. After the death of her husband Mrs. Brott came with her family to Richland county, in 1863, settling in Marshall township. Mrs. Bailey is the youngest in the family of three children; Almira is the wife of David Scott, of Syracuse, N. Y., and Adelbert is now located in the west. Mr. and Mrs. Bailey have five children: Carrie is the wife of William Hall, of Vernon county, and the have three children; Van, who was born April 2, 1879, is engaged in the general merchandise business at West Bosston; married Miss Louise Chitwood, of Sylvan township, and they have two children; Abi, who was born Aug. 27, 1881, is the wife of Elmer Johnson, of Sylvan township, and they have three children; Er, who was born Oct. 26, 1885, remains at the parental home as does also Othni, who was born Mar. 9, 1887.
    L. D. BAILEY is the editor and publisher of the Richland Rustic at Richland Center, and although not "to the manner born," nor the product of early training in the newspaper business, yet he has met with flattering success in the work, as is attested by the columns of his paper and the finely equipped plant which he possesses. The Bailey family has been a prominent one in the annals of Richland county history for a full half century, and the members thereof have left their impress upon the record of republic affairs. The father of the subject of this review was Elihu Bailey, the mention of whose name recalls a career of public usefulness, than which none is more deserving of words of praise. Elihu Bailey was a native of Belmont county, Ohio, and was the offspring of southern parentage, his father having been born in Maryland and his mother was a native of Virginia. He received his education in the early schools of Ohio and in his youth learned the trade of a blacksmith, but later changed his occupation to that of a farmer. In early life he showed great ability as a public speaker, which reputation was retained throughout a long and useful career, and he took an active part in the anti-slavery movement. He was a candidate in Ohio at different times on the Free Soil ticket for member of each branch of the legislature, and he was one of the organizers of Republican party in 1856. In that year he migrated to Wisconsin and settled on Mill creek in the town of Marshall, Richland county, entered land on section 31, and thereafter devoted his attention to farming, which occupation he followed until 1886, when he retired and took up his residence with his daughter in Sylvan township, dying quite suddenly at Richland Center while attending the county fair on Sept. 30, 1898. Immediately after his arrival in Richland county he began to take a deep interest in public affairs, and his ability being recognized he was soon called upon to fill positions of trust. In 1858 he was a candidate for county clerk, and was beaten by a plurality of only eight votes in a total of over fourteen hundred. In 1860 he was elected to represent Richland county in the Wisconsin assembly, and ten years later he was again elected to the same position, being also elected assemblyman in 1876, and again in 1878 he was elected to represent the west half of the county. During the legislative session of 1870 he was prominently mentioned as a candidate for speaker of the assembly, and he also had loyal supporters for the position of United States senator at the election held at that time. During the Civil War he was prominent in recruiting soldiers for the service and in various other ways showed his loyalty and devotion to the Union. Besides the legislative office mentioned above Mr. Bailey filled various local positions, and he officiated also as a local Methodist Episcopal preacher for several years. When he first came to Richland county he taught in the pioneer schools of that day, and, all in all, his life was of great usefulness to the community in which fortune cast his lot. He selected his helpmate in the battle of life Miss Emily Wadsworth, who died April 16, 1858, at the age of thirty-eight years, leaving a family of seven children, all of whom are living. Ruth Anna, the eldest, married Asher Kerby and resides in Richland Center; A. S. is a practicing physician and is located at Lorimor, Ia.; Cassie married John Cook Sylva and resides in Sylvan; Udora married Achilles Ewers and resides in Reedstown, Wis.; Cassius is a resident of Lorimor, Ia.; L. D. is the immediate subject of this review, and Orinda married William King, and resides in Richland Center. The father married a second time, in 1859, the lady of his choice being Miss Amanda Ewers, of Ohio, and to that union three children were born, the names and other facts concerning whom are as follows: Elma married W. H. McDaniel and resides in Michigan City, Ind.; Alba married George Fowell of the town of Sylvan, and resides in Sylvan; and Delia. L. D. Bailey, the immediate subject of this memoir, was born at Belpie, Washington county, Ohio, April 11, 1854, and was but two years old when his parents immigrated to Richland county, where he was reared upon the home farm, receiving his education in the public schools. He remained with his father on the old homestead until he had reached the age of twenty-eight years, and he the started his independent career by accepting a clerkship in a store at the village of Boaz. After a time he came to Richland Center and accepted a position in a clothing store, removing his family to the county seat and taking up his residence there in 1886. He remained in Richland Center until 1889 and then removed to Big Timber, Mont., where he had charge of a large mercantile establishment for about seven months. In 1900 he returned to Richland Center and went into partnership with his son, Harry, in the publication of the Richland Rustic, and this association continued until June, 1906, when his son retired from the business and Mr. Bailey became the sole proprietor. He was always clung to the political faith which finds expression in the principles of the Republican party, but he has never entered the ranks of office-seekers, although during the session of Congress in the winter of 1904-5 his party service was recognized by appointment to a clerkship in Washington, D. C. Mr. Bailey was married, March 19, 1878, to Miss Mattie Henry, a native of Richland county and a daughter of William and Lydia (Miller) Henry, both of whom were born in Ohio, but were early settlers of Richland county, settling in the town of Buena Vista in 1856. The father and mother now reside in Gotham. To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Bailey there has been born one son, Harry, a newspaper man by profession, who for a number of years past has been one of the editors and publishers of the Richland Rustic. The subject of this review holds membership in the Mystic Workers, the Beavers, and also in the Yeomen.
    L. H. BANCROFT, who is one of the representative members of the bar of Richland County, being engaged in the practice of his profession at Richland Center, has held numerous offices of public trust and is recognized as a legist and jurist of high attainments. Judge Bancroft comes of stanch Revolutionary stock in both the paternal and maternal lines, and on this score is entitled to and retains membership in the Sons of the American Revolution, while prior service of his ancestors has given him also a place on the roster of the Wisconsin Society of the Colonial Wars. He was born at Bear Creek, Sauk County, Wisconsin, Dec. 26, 1860, and is a son of George I. and Helen M. (Randolph) Bancroft. After completing a course in the high school at Lone Rock, Richland county, Judge Bancroft continued his academic studies in the University of Wisconsin, finally being matriculated in its law department, in which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1884, duly receiving the degree of Bachelor of Laws and being admitted to the bar of his native state. Since 1886 he has maintained his home in Richland Center, where he has built up a very large and representative professional business and gained distinctive prestige. He served as district attorney of the county from 1888 to 1890, proving a most zealous and able public prosecutor. He was supervisor of the second ward of Richland Center for two year; was city attorney of Richland Center for six years; was county judge four years, and was first assistant attorney general of the state from 1903 to 1905. In every public office to which he has been called Judge Bancroft has exhibited distinctive executive ability and technical acumen, gaining and reinforcing the esteem and confidence of the people. In politics he is a stanch adherent of the Republican party, and he is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, the Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent & Protective Order of Elks, and the Modern Woodmen of America. June 11, 1890, Judge Bancroft was united in marriage to Miss Myrtle DeLap, daughter of Hon. Robert H. DeLap, M. D., a prominent and influential citizen of Richland Center. The children of this union are Carolyn, born May 26, 1891, and Blaine DeLap, born Aug. 23, 1895. Elected member of assembly for Richland County, Wis., in 1906.
    HENRY W. BANNISTER, a farmer living four miles north of Richland Center, is of English parentage and birth. His father, James Bannister, was born in 1824 and his mother, Nancy H. (Collins) Banister, on June 14 of the same year. They were married in England and came to New York in 1855 and the following year to Milwaukee, where the remained thirteen years, coming to Richland county in 1869, where they located on 154 acres of land in the woods. Here they spent the next twenty years of their lives together, until the death of Mr. Bannister, April 7, 1889. Mrs. Bannister survived her husband for thirteen years, passing away Aug. 25, 1902. They were both members of the Episcopal church, and politically Mr. Bannister affiliated with the Republican party. Of their six children, three sons and three daughters, but two remain, one daughter, Mrs. Mary Russell, and the subject of this sketch. The latter was born Aug. 23, 1843. His education was begun in his native land and continued in the schools of Schenectady, N. Y., and Milwaukee. He is a machinist by trade and in his early life worked for the Mil. & St. P. R. R. Co., until he came in 1869 to Richland county and took up farming in the company of his father. The clearing of the woodland and the putting up of the buildings and other improvements are mostly his work. He now owns 154 acres, and is engaged largely in stock raising, keeping red-polled cattle and pure blooded Poland-China hogs. Like his father, he is a Republican, and has survived on the school board for eighteen years. The family attends the United Brethern church. He married, March 27, 1872, Miss Susannah M. Graham, born in Jefferson county, Wis., June 13, 1852, and who died Dec. 6, 1903. They had two children, both sons, John H. born May 25, 1873, who was educated in the common schools of his native town, took up farming as a vocation, and is a representative Republican, having held the office of justice of the peace for eight years and clerk of the district for two years, which latter position he still holds, the other son, Alvin W., was born Sept. 15, 1879, is also a Republican and is employed at the skimming station at Horse Creek, for Burnham & Scott, of Richland Center. Mrs. H. W. Bannister's parents Thomas and Elizabeth (Nalpress) Graham, were born in England, near London, and came to Jefferson county in 1851 and to Richland county in 1856. They settled in Marshall township, where Mrs. Graham died in 1891, and where her husband still resides. Mr. Graham served in the Civil War for two years, taking part in Sherman's famous march "from the Atlanta to the sea."
    WILBER G. BARRY, the editor and publisher of the Richland Democrat, is one of the prominent young newspaper men of southwestern Wisconsin, and his success in that field of labor has been due entirely to his habits of industry, close attention to business, and a thorough equipment for the various departments of the work in which he is engaged. Mr. Barry is a native of the Badger State, having been born at Pardeeville, Columbia county, on Sept. 19, 1866, and he is the eldest son of George W. and Mahala E. (Lawton) Barry. The father, George W. Barry, was born in the state of New York, in February, 1830, and the mother is a native of the same state, the date of her birth being Jan. 5, 1836. The occupation of the father was that of a painter, which business he followed during all of his active life, and for twelve years prior to his death he was a resident of Richland Center. On Dec. 28, 1863, he entered the Union army as a private in Company A of the First Wisconsin volunteer infantry and served with that command until Sept. 19, 1864, when he was transferred to Company B of the Twenty-first Wisconsin infantry, and on June 8, 1865, he again transferred to Company B of the Third regiment of Wisconsin infantry, with which latter command he was mustered out on July 18, 1865. During his term of service he participated in the celebrated Georgia campaign, which resulted in the capture of Atlanta, and then took part in that wild, bold and romantic march which is known in history as Sherman's "march to the sea." With his regiment he shared actively in the Carolina campaign, which "marked the earth with ruin," and then accompanied the command to Washington, where he participated in the grand review. After the close of the war Mr. Barry returned to his Wisconsin home, resuming the thread of civil life, and in 1875, as stated above, took up his residence in Richland Center, where he followed his occupation until his death, on Jan. 7, 1887. His widow now resides in the city of Madison. Mr. and Mrs. Barry were the parents of five children, all of whom are living. Lillian, the eldest, is the wife of George Burroughs and resides at Soldiers' Grove, Wis.; Eva is the wife of William Castle and resides in the city of Madison; Wilber G. is the immediate subject of this biographical review; Ida M. is the widow of Willis J. Sherrard and resides in Richland Center, and Frederick is a resident of Viroqua, Wis. Wilber G. Barry, whose name introduces this memoir, was but nine years old when his parents removed to Richland Center, and hence the greater part of his life has been spent in the county to the history of which this volume is dedicated. He received his primary education in the common schools of Pardeeville, and supplemented the knowledge thus gained by attendance upon the graded and high schools of Richland Center. At the early age of thirteen years he entered the office of the Richland Rustic at Richland Center, and during several years of apprenticeship and employment as a journeyman he thoroughly mastered the "art preservative of all arts." In 1890 he secured a position in a job printing establishment in the city of Madison and during the ensuing two years devoted his time exclusively to that branch of the printing business. There seeming to be an opening in Richland county for a newspaper representing the principles of the Democratic party, in 1892 Mr. Barry made the necessary arrangements and upon Sept. 21, of that year, launched the first number of the Richland Democrat. Judged by the fate that had attended previous efforts the project was a doubtful one. Several attempts had been made to establish a paper of that political faith in the county seat of Richland, but in every instance it seemed that the obstacles were insurmountable, and after a feeble existence of a comparatively short time they had all gone by the board and ceased to exist. Neither was the time propitious, for the financial disaster that plunged the civilized world into a disastrous panic was beginning, and the effect was already visible to the discerning eye. But Mr. Barry was in possession of the energy that accompanies youth and the determination that typifies the true American, so he launched his bark upon the uncertain sea and took his position at the helm to guide its course. Success has crowned his efforts, and today the Richland Democrat ranks among the leading papers of southwestern Wisconsin and its editor ranks high among the newspaper men of the state. Able editorials grace the pages of every issue of the paper, but its chief strength lies in the excellent local news service which it affords its patrons, and mechanically it compares favorably with any competitor in the field. Aside from his newspaper work Mr. Barry finds time to devote to other interests and he is at present the efficient secretary of the Richland County Agricultural Society. On March 24, 1891, Mr. Barry was united in marriage to Miss Maggie I. Brimer, daughter of John N. and Nancy A. (Miller) Brimer, of Richland Center, and to this union one daughter has been born, Grace M. Barry, born in 1896. Mr. Barry is a member of Richland lodge, No. 66, Free & Accepted Masons, Linden lodge No. 126, Knights of Pythias, and the Modern Woodmen of America.
    JOHN F. BEARDSLEY is one of the prominent and successful business men of Lone Rock, where he has resided during the past thirty-five years, and his success in his chosen field of endeavor has been entirely due to those sterling traits of character which are prominent characteristics of the true American citizen. Mr. Beardsley was born in Herkimer county, N.Y., on March 29, 1845, and is the son of John S. and Zervan (King) Beardsley, both of whom were natives of the same county and state, and descended from old New England stock. The paternal grandfather of the subject of this review died in Herkimer county and the father came west in September, 1856, making the journey to Warren, Ill., by rail, and thence driving to Mineral Point, where he permanently located. He resided at the latter place until 1880, and then removed to Lone Rock, where he spent the remainder of his days, dying in 1903, at the age of seventy-seven years, and his wife died in 1885, aged sixty-one, both being buried in the cemetery at Lone Rock. During their residence at Mineral Point the family were sufferers from the great cyclone that visited that section of the country, their buildings being all demolished. The schoolhouse which stood near by was blown away and the eldest daughter of the subject of this review was one of the pupils whose life was endangered, nothing remaining of the house except about ten feet square of the floor, upon which the children were huddled together for safety. All of them escaped, save two cousins of Mr. Beardsley, a little boy and a little girl, who were blown into the woods and mangled beyond recognition. Our subject is the eldest of four children who were born to Mr. and Mrs. John S. Beardsley, the names and other facts concerning the others being as follows: Sarah Jane married William Chrissman and resides at Ilion, N.Y.; Eliza married William Mathews and lived at Mineral Point, where she died and is buried; and Lucetta married J. Hildreth and after his death married Rev. W. H. Harrington and resides at Seattle, Wash. J. F. Beardsley was twelve years old when his parents came to Wisconsin, and prior to their removal he had attended school in his native county, but he completed his education in the public schools of the Badger State. He began his independent career as a farmer at Mineral Point, and remained so engaged until 1870, when he removed to Lone Rock and began the business of selling musical instruments and sewing machines. He later entered the employ of the McCormick Harvesting Machine company as salesman, and at one time had as his territory the counties of Richland, Sauk, Grant and Iowa. He located in Lone Rock as a local dealer in 1880 and has since been engaged in the implement business, dealing in harvesting machinery and all kinds of implements, threshers, engines, shredders, etc. He added lumber to his business in 1894, and in that line carries everything required in the shape of building material. Mr. Beardsley was first married in 1866 to Miss Lucy Schellinger and to this union there were born two children, - Ada, the eldest, being the wife of S. N. Peebles of Lone Rock, and George, a farmer in Bear valley, town of Buena Vista, who married Miss Betsy Sawyer, a native of Buena Vista township. Mr. Beardsley was again married in 1884, to Miss Jane Mumford, of Mineral Point, Iowa County. His second wife was born in the county seat while her father was sheriff of the county, he having served in that capacity under Judge M. M. Cothran. The father's name was Charles N. Mumford, and after serving as sheriff he removed to Crawford county, and still later to Lone Rock in Richland county, where he died in 1901, at the age of eighty-seven years, his wife surviving until 1906 and being ninety-two years old at the time of her death. Mr. Mumford served in a cavalry regiment during the Civil War, and three of his sons were also soldiers in the Union army. J. F. Beardsley and wife are the parents of three children, - Mary, a graduate in music, stenography and bookkeeping from the St. Mary's Convent at Prairie DuChien, Jay and Belle, all residing at home. Our subject at present holds the position of justice of the peace at Lone Rock, and is also police justice and town treasurer. Fraternally he is a member of the Masonic order.
    JOHN W. BEIGHLEY has attained to success and prestige as one of the representative farmers of his native county and is the owner of a well improved homestead of 120 acres, in Forest township. He was born in the town of Sylvan, this county, Aug. 23, 1856, and is a son of Taualt R. and Mary C. (Matthews) Beighley, both natives of Butler county, Penn., where the former was born in June, 1830, and the latter in June, 1833. The paternal grandfather of the subject of this sketch was John Beighley, who passed the closing years of his life in the state of Iowa. The maternal grandfather passed his entire life in Pennsylvania. The parents of the subject of this review were married in the old Keystone State, and in 1854 they came to Richland county, Wis., and became pioneer settlers in Sylvan township, where the father secured forty acres of wild land, eventually developing a good farm of 120 acres. His father likewise located in this township, where he operated a sawmill for some time. He was a soldier in the War of 1812. Taualt R. Beighley was a stalwart supporter of the principles of the Republican party and held various township offices, having been a man of sterling character and having commanded the unqualified esteem of his fellow men. He was a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal church, as is also his widow, and of their ten children four sons and four daughters survive the honored father, whose death occurred July 31, 1903. John W. Beighley was reared on the home farm and early became inured to the strenuous work involved in its improvement and cultivation, in the meanwhile duly availing himself of the advantages of the district schools. He has won a position of independence and definite prosperity through his own efforts and has been the owner of his present homestead since 1901, devoting his attention to general farming and stock growing and being known as a reliable and enterprising business man, worthy of the confidence and esteem so freely accorded him. His political support is given to the Republican party, and he has served as a member of the school board of his district, never having been an aspirant for political office. Sept. 26, 1890, Mr. Beighley was married to Miss Emma Dary, who likewise was born in Sylvan township, being a daughter of John Dary, a prominent farmer. The children of this union are Clarence, Victor Earl, Milton Craig and Beulah. In May, 1896, Mr. Beighley contracted a second marriage, being then united to Mrs. Uradell Allbaugh, who was born in Bloom township, this county, Jan. 11, 1870, being a daughter of Elijah and Eliza Essex, both native of Ohio, whence they came to Richland county in 1861, settling on a farm in the town of Bloom, where they passed the remainder of their lives. Mr. Allbaugh, who was a blacksmith by trade, was born in Carroll county, Ohio, Feb. 13, 1824, and his death occurred Nov. 14, 1896. His wife was born in Holmes county, Ohio, Dec. 12, 1837, and died Aug. 24, 1888. Mr. Essex was a Republican in politics and he held various local offices, including that of chairman of the town board. He and his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Of their four children three are living. Mr. and Mrs. Beighley became the parents of seven children, whose names, with respective date of birth, are as follows: Minnie Belle, April 14, 1897; Clinton Archer, April 11, 1898, died on the 24th of the following December; Mary Alina, Dec. 22, 1899; Jesse Bernard, March 23, 1901; Leon Glenn, Oct. 17, 1903; and Fred Byron, Jan. 17, 1905. Mr. and Mrs. Beighley are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. In conclusion it may be said that the father of Mr. Beighley was in active service in the Civil War having enlisted in 1861 as a fifer in Company I, Twelfth Wisconsin volunteer infantry, in which he served three years, after which he re-enlisted, being transferred to Company F of the same regiment and continuing in service, as a musician, until the close of the war.
    CHARLES J. BENDER, a farmer for many years and now mail carrier on Route No. 1, of the Boaz postoffice, was born on the old Bender homestead in the town of Forest, Richland county, Jan. 30, 1858. His parents were Jonas C. and Mary (Briggs) Bender. (For mention of Jonas C. Bender see sketch of Fred J. Bender). His education was received in the common schools of the town of Forest. Until 1904 he was a farmer. That year he received an appointment as carrier and has since been employed by the government. He still owns, however, a farm of eighty acres in the towns of Akan and Sylvan. Politically he is a Republican and as such served as justice of the peace of the town of Akan for two terms. In religious matters he and his family are affiliated with the United Brethren church of Boaz. On Feb. 10, 1897, Mr. Bender married Mary A., daughter of Jacob J. and Anzy E. (Goff) Miller. Jacob J. Miller was born in Darke county, Ohio Jan. 10, 1819, and came to the town of Orion, Richland county in 1852, with his mother, Mary (McClure) Miller, his father having died in Ohio. He died in Richland county in 1868. Anzy A. Goff was one of seven children of George and Mary (Menier) Goff, natives of Virginia who early emigrated to Arkansas on horseback, and from there went to Missouri. In 1848 they came to Wisconsin and settled in the town of Eagle, Richland county. To Mr. and Mrs. Bender have been born four daughters, viz.: Ruth Nellie; Sarah Ida, died in infancy; Mary Anzy; and Rose Etta. Mr. Bender is well and widely known throughout his county.
    EMANUEL P. BENDER, of Richland Center, was born in Somerset county, Penn., Dec. 25, 1791, and Susannah (Wilt) Bender, born in York, Lancaster county, Penn., April 27, 1795. They were married Dec. 12, 1812, and had a family of seventeen children, twelve boys and five girls, of whom all but two grew to maturity. Probably the record of this family in the Civil War is unique; six of Peter Bender's sons, three of his sons-in-law, viz,: Aaron Shaffer, Simon P. Kanabbe, and Isaac N. Neher, and four of his grandsons responded to the call for volunteers. Emanuel P. Bender, the representative of the family from Richland county, was born at Paint, Fayette county, Ohio, Dec. 17, 1833. He enlisted as a private soldier in Company I, of the Twelfth Regiment, Sept. 1, 1861, and participated in the movements of the company and regiment, - which are noted in Chapter V, - until his discharge from the hospital at Davenport, Iowa, July 15, 1864. With the exception of the time spent in the army, he has been a farmer and a blacksmith all his mature life, until his retirement from active labor about seven years ago. He is a Republican, and himself and family are members of the United Brethren church, joining that religious organization in 1860. On June 28, 1857, he was married to Miss Ruannah Custer, daughter of Abraham and Eliza (Burkett) Custer, of Somerset county, Penn., and their children in the order of their ages are as follows: Susannah, Uriah T., James A., Olive A., Simon S., Harvey L., Rebecca M., Frank E., Bertha D., Wesley J., John M., and Minnie L. Mrs. Bender's maternal family was named Berkette, and her great grandfather served in the Revolutionary War, dying at the great age of one hundred and one years.
    FRED J. BENDER, postmaster of Boaz, was born in the town of Forest, Richland county, Feb. 13, 1870. His parents were Jonas C. and Mary (Briggs) Bender, the former born in Ohio, July 19, 1836, and the latter in Illinois, Sept. 21, 1835. The paternal grandfather of the genial postmaster was Peter Bender, a native of Pennsylvania, who had early emigrated to Ohio and in 1854 had come to Richland county, settling on the farm where Fred was born. He died Dec. 25, 1859. His wife was Susanna Wilt, also a native of Pennsylvania, who died in the Richland county homestead in 1884. On the maternal side the postmaster is a grandson of David Briggs, a native of New York who came to Walworth county, Wis., in 1847 and died in Iowa thirty years later. His wife, Abigail Johnson, was born in New York and died on the Richland county homestead in 1878. Jonas Bender went to Pennsylvania with his parents when he was but four years of age. It was there he received his education and in 1854 he came to Wisconsin with his parents, settling on the farm in the town of Forest. In later years he purchased a farm of ninety-three acres in the town of Dayton; this he sold after a few years and went to Ohio and on Nov. 9, 1901 he died in Pennsylvania. His wife died some years earlier, on Oct. 29, 1885. Of their eleven children nine are living: Charles J., Elizabeth M., Martha S., Laura L., Rachel R., Fred J., David W., Sarah M., and Jesse L. Politically Jonas Bender was a Republican and as such served for three years as chairman for Forest township. For a number of years he was a member of the town board. The schools of the town of Forest supplied Fred J. Bender with his early education. Some time was put in in the Boaz graded schools and the Richland Center high school. Until he was eighteen Fred worked on the farm. Then he clerked in a general store in Boaz for a number of years. The seven years following he worked as a cheese-maker; one season was spent "on the road" selling dairy supplies and one year buying cheese. In July, 1904, he received his appointment as postmaster at Boaz, and has served continuously and faithfully since. In January, 1906, he opened a mercantile business which promises to pay well. Politically he is a Republican, and for three years in succession served in the capacity of town clerk. After an absence of four years from the office he was again chosen to fill it, in the spring election of 1906. He has always taken an active part in political affairs. Mr. Bender is not affiliated with any religious organization, but his parents were and his older brother and sisters are members of the United Brethren church.
    HENRY BENDER is one of the sterling pioneers of Richland county and is the owner of one of the fine farms of Forest township, where he has lived since his boyhood days. He was born in Somerset county, Penn., Jan. 28, 1849, and is a son of William H. and Mary (Barnt) Bender, both of whom were likewise born in the old Keystone State, as were also the former's parents, Peter and Susan Bender. William H. Bender removed with his family to Wisconsin in 1854, and settled on a pioneer farm of eighty acres in the midst of the virgin forest of the town of Forest, Richland county. He reclaimed his land to cultivation and was one of the honored citizens of the township. He was a Republican in politics and both he and his wife were members of the United Brethren church. Of their five children two are living, Ephraim, who is a successful farmer of this county, and Henry, who is the subject of this sketch. Henry Bender was reared to manhood on the home farm and his educational advantages were those afforded in the district schools. He has continued to be actively and successfully identified with agricultural pursuits during his entire independent career and is now the owner of a well improved farm of 280 acres, devoted to general farming and stock-growing. He is a stalwart supporter of the principles and policies of the Republican party and both he and his wife are zealous members of the United Brethren church. Feb. 22, 1871, Mr. Bender was united in marriage to Miss Rachel Taylor, who was born in the state of New York and who died April 22, 1885, leaving no children. April 22, 1886, Mr. Bender married Miss Belle Kintz, who was born and reared in Richland county, being a daughter of B. Frank and Eliza Kintz, pioneers of this county, where the former still resides, his wife having entered into eternal rest June 11, 1906. Mr. and Mrs. Bender became the parents of five children, - Clarence, Harry, Hazel, Florence May, who died in childhood, and George.
    GRANVILLE BERKSHIRE has passed practically his entire life in Richland county, having been less than one year of age at the time of his parents' removal to this section of the state, in the pioneer days. He is now owner of the old homestead farm which his father secured nearly half a century ago, in the town of Marshall, being one of the representative agriculturists and stock-growers of the township and a citizen who commands unqualified esteem in the community. Mr. Berkshire was born in Tuscarawas county, Ohio, Jan. 31, 1857, and is a son of Joseph and Eliza (Cecil) Berkshire, the former of whom was born in southeastern Ohio, Feb. 7, 1826, and the latter in Meigs county, that state, Aug. 5, 1823. Joseph Berkshire was a son of Robert Berkshire, who was one of the pioneers of Tuscarawas county, where he was a farmer, and both he and his wife remained residents of the old Buckeye State until their death. They became the parents of five sons and two daughters, Joseph being the youngest and the only member of the family to come to Wisconsin. He was reared and educated in Ohio, where his marriage was solemnized April 30, 1846. He thereafter continued to be engaged in agricultural pursuits in Meigs county until 1857, when he came with his family to Richland county, Wisconsin. He settled in section 17, Marshall township where he purchased 160 acres of land, all of which was still covered with the native timber except a clearing of about five acres, where had been constructed a log cabin and stable of the pioneer type. This fine farm estate is now owned by the subject of this sketch. The father reclaimed the greater portion of the land to cultivation and made excellent improvements of a permanent nature, became one of the substantial farmers of the township and passed the residue of his life on this homestead, where he died March 9, 1900, in the fullness of years and honored by all who knew him. His devoted wife was summoned to the life eternal April 4, 1895, both having been zealous and consistent members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and the father having been a Democrat in his political allegiance. Joseph Berkshire was a valiant soldier in Company I, Forty-sixth Wisconsin volunteer infantry in the Civil War, serving one year. Concerning his children the following data are properly entered at this juncture: Aden L., born Aug. 5, 1847, is a farmer in Juneau county, Asenath L., who was born Dec. 8, 1849, is deceased, having been the wife of Richard Jones, who is a resident of Crawford county; Tedrick, who was born Oct. 1, 1851, died at the age of thirty-seven years; Maria J., who was born July 20, 1853, died young, as did also Mary, who was born March 24, 1856; Granville is the immediate subject of this review; Keziah, born Aug. 13, 1861, is the wife of William Ferguson, of Bloom township; and Elizabeth, born May 21, 1864, is the wife of James Queen, of the town of Marshall. Owing to the exigencies and conditions of time and place, Granville Berkshire received limited educational advantages in his youth, attending the pioneer schools at brief and irregular intervals and in the meanwhile lending an active and arduous co-operation in connection with the reclaiming and cultivation of the home farm. He has lived continuously on the old homestead save for six years passed in Richland Center, where he was engaged in the buying and shipping of live stock. After the death of his honored father he bought the homestead, which now comprises 270 acres of land and which is one of the finely improved places of the township, about 170 acres being under effective cultivation. He has made a specialty in the past of raising high-grade live stock, and this department of his farming enterprise is one to which he still gives much attention, being known as an authority in stock values and in methods of breeding and handling cattle, sheep and swine. In politics he maintains an independent attitude, supporting men and measures rather than being dominated by a spirit of partisanship. Mrs. Berkshire is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. Oct. 15, 1887, Mr. Berkshire was united in marriage to Miss Rose Myers, who was born in the town of Bloom, this county, being a daughter of Fletcher and Nancy Myers, the former of whom was born in Indiana and the latter in Ohio. They were pioneers of Richland county and Mr. Myers became one of the representative farmers of Bloom township, where he continued to reside until his death. His widow later married Moses C. Davis, and they still reside in the town of Bloom. Mr. and Mrs. Berkshire have three children, whose names, with respective dates of birth, are as follows: Kenneth, Feb. 4, 1891; Leah, Nov. 23, 1894; and Freda, Nov. 23, 1897.
    NEWTON H. BLAKELY is one of the representative farmers of Forest township and has passed his entire life in Richland county, where he is held in unqualified esteem. He was born in the town of Forest, this county, October 16, 1859, and is a son of George and Elizabeth (Morrow) Blakely, both native of the state of Pennsylvania. They removed from Butler county, that state to Illinois, where they remained one summer, at the expiration of which, in 1856, they came to Richland county, Wis., settling on a tract of wild land in section 4, town of Forest, where the father reclaimed a good farm. Both he and his wife passed the remainder of their lives on the old homestead and to them was accorded the high regard of the community in which they so long maintained their home. Both were devoted members of the United Brethren church and in politics he was a stanch supporter of the Republican party. The subject of this sketch was reared on the home farm and early began to contribute his quota to its work, in the meanwhile availing himself of the advantages of the local schools. He has continuously resided in Forest township, where he now owns and operates a well improved farm of 190 acres, being a progressive and successful business man. In politics he renders allegiance to the Republican party and he has served three terms as a member of the town board. In a fraternal way he is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Modern Woodmen of America. Jan. 11, 1884, Mr. Blakely was united in marriage to Miss Carrie Gates, daughter of Norman and Jane Gates, who removed to Richland county, from Minnesota. Mr. and Mrs. Blakely have four children, namely: Blaine, Sadie, Bessie and Nellie.
    RICHARD BORCHARDT is one of those energetic and progressive citizens who have attained to success in connection with the great basic art of agriculture, and he is numbered among the prosperous and popular farmers of Willow township. He was born in the city of Berlin, Germany, Nov. 16, 1860 and is a son of Ernest and Matilda Adelaide (Anderson) Borchardt, who immigrated to America in 1862. The mother died at sea, of consumption, and the father settled with his family in Jefferson county, Wis., where he engaged in farming, remaining there until 1873, when he removed to Richland county and took up his residence in Willow township, where he developed a good farm and where he passed the remainder of his life. He landed in America with his two motherless children, aged respectively three years and eight months, his devoted wife having died on the voyage, as already stated, and to add to his responsibilities he was practically without financial resources, having had but five dollars, a gold piece, upon his arrival and having lost this from his pocket. By hard work and good management he became independent, providing a good home for his children. The elder of the two children is John Borchardt, who resides in Dayton township, this county. The subject of this sketch was reared to the sturdy discipline of the farm and has been continuously identified with the agricultural pursuits from his youth to the present time. His educational advantages were those of the common schools and he is known as a man of strong mentality and marked individuality. He is the owner of eighty acres of fine land, having secured the same when it was covered with the native timber and having personally effected the reclamation of every acre. The first buildings erected by him were of primitive type, later being replaced with better ones and finally the latter gave way for the present modern buildings, which add to the value and attractiveness of the well cultivated farmstead. His second residence was a substantial frame building and this was destroyed by fire, after which he erected his present commodious brick house, one of the best farm homes in this section of the county. In addition to general agriculture Mr. Borchardt devoted considerable attention to stock-growing, and he keeps an average herd of ten dairy cattle. He is a loyal and public-spirited citizen, is a Republican in his political proclivities, and both he and his wife hold membership in the Methodist Episcopal church. In 1888 Mr. Borchardt was united in marriage to Miss Mary Lahn, daughter of John Lahn, who is a representative farmer of Sauk county. The children of this union are six in number, namely: Emma, Lizzie, Lillie, Leona, Rena and John.
    BOSTON K. BORLAND is one of the representative farmers of Richland county, of which he is a native son, being a member of one of the old and honored pioneer families of this section of the state and now the owner of one of the fine farm properties of the town of Bloom. He was born on the old homestead farm, in the little pioneer log cabin, in the town of Bloom, Sept. 7, 1856, being a son of Thomas and Margaret J. (Jewell) Borland. Thomas Borland, born in Pennsylvania, was a son of John Borland, a native of Ireland. The latter was one of the early settlers of Jackson county, Ohio, where he reclaimed a farm in the midst of the forest. In that county Thomas was reared and educated. He was an ambitious student in his youth and eligible for pedagogic honors, having been a successful teacher for many years. In 1852 he married Miss Margaret J. Jewell, who was born and reared in Carroll county, Ohio, being a daughter of Gilbert and Jane (Keene) Jewell, the former of whom was born in New Jersey and the latter in Pennsylvania. They were married in the old Keystone State, and about three years later removed to Carroll county, Ohio, where they passed the remainder of their lives, Mr. Jewell having been a farmer and having also followed the blacksmith's trade. They became the parents of eight children, all of whom are deceased except the mother of the subject of this sketch, and Robert, who still resides in Carroll county, Ohio. Thomas Borland was the eldest in a family of nine children, of whom six are living. Thomas Borland remained with his parents until his marriage, and he was a successful and popular teacher in both Jackson and Carroll counties, Ohio, also doing much work as a surveyor. In 1845 he came with his wife to the wilds of Richland county, becoming one of the first settlers of the town of Bloom, where he secured eighty acres of heavily timbered land, in section 2. He made a clearing and put up his log house, after which he proceeded with the work of reclaiming his land to cultivation. He assisted in cutting through the first roads in this section of the county and found much requisition for his services as a surveyor, having served a number of years as deputy county surveyor. He was also one of the pioneer teachers of the county, and taught in one school during eleven winter terms and, in all, taught about twenty terms of school after coming to this county. He served as justice of the peace and was one of the prominent and influential citizens of the county. He espoused the cause of the Republican party at the time of its organization and was ever afterward a loyal supporter of its principles. He was a devout member of the Dunkard church, as is also his widow, who still resides on the old homestead, where his death occurred in October, 1903. To them were born four children: Catherine Jane, who became the wife of Charles Peck, died Dec. 30, 1885, leaving two children; Boston K., the immediate subject of this sketch, was the next in order of birth; John Gilbert died at the age of two years; and Margaret Ann is the wife of James Hunter, of Vernon county, their children being six in number. Boston K. Borland was reared under the conditions and influences of the pioneer days and his educational privileges were necessarily limited in scope. He continued to be associated in the work of the home farm until two years after his marriage and he still owns the place, in company with his venerable mother. He was married in 1879 and two years later took up his residence on his present farm, which is one-fourth of a mile west of the old homestead. His landed estate comprises 520 acres and he has about 200 acres under cultivation, having one of the best farms in the town of Bloom. In 1903 he erected his present attractive and commodious residence and in the following year he built his fine bank barn, thirty-six by sixty feet in dimensions. He has made the best of improvements on his farm and on every side are evidences of thrift and prosperity. He is held in unqualified esteem in the community and while he has never sought or held office he takes a loyal interest in public affairs and is a stanch supporter of the cause of the Republican party. He and his wife hold membership in the Christian church. Sept. 21, 1879, Mr. Borland was united in marriage to Miss Mary E. Morgan, who was born in Logansport, Ind., being a daughter of Squire and Catherine (Jones) Morgan, the former of whom was born in Kentucky and the latter in Indiana. They came to Richland county in 1868, locating in the town of Bloom, where Mr. Morgan secured a farm and where both he and his wife passed the residue of their lives. In conclusion is given a brief record concerning the children of Mr. and Mrs. Borland: Nancy Margaret, who was born Sept. 2, 1883, is the wife of Harry Ford, of Leroy, Dodge county, and they have two children, - Stanley and Lynn; Nora Catherine, who was born May 1, 1885, is the wife of Isaac Chatten, of Union, Vernon county, and they have one daughter, - Freda; Samuel Wallace, who was born Oct. 2, 1886, and who is a successful farmer of Bloom township, married Miss Pearl Mosier and they have one daughter, - Vera; Matilda Jane, who was born Oct. 6, 1889, is the wife of Ernest McKittrick, of Bridgeport, Wash.; and the four younger children remain at the parental home, - John Thomas, born Dec. 22, 1892; Nellie May, born Oct. 10, 1894; Irvin, born Nov. 5, 1898; and Beryl, born December 15, 1902.
    JAMES P. BOUCHER, manufacturer of and dealer in harness, saddlery, and all turf supplies, at Lone Rock, was born at Prairie du Chien, Crawford county, Wis., Aug. 1, 1873, and is the son of Oliver and Helen (King) Boucher. His father and mother were both natives of Canada, having been born in the province of Quebec, of French parentage, and they came to Wisconsin at an early date and settled in Crawford county, where they spent the remainder of their lives. The father had a brother, Louis, who also settled in Crawford county, but the latter died several years ago. Two brothers of the mother, Charles and Alva King, reside in Michigan. The father was a farmer by occupation and spent his life in Crawford county, dying on Nov. 1, 1882, aged about sixty-four years, and the mother died in 1886 at the age of forty-nine. They were the parents of ten children, the names and other facts concerning whom are given as follows: Alvene married Serfin Sherrier and resides in Prairie du Chien; Addie married James Loving, who is now deceased, and she resides in Washington, D.C.; Louis is a resident of Prairie du Chien; Victor resides at Chippewa Falls; David is a resident of Milwaukee; Mattie resides at Helena, Mont.; Benjamin is a resident of Flambeau, Wis.; Odeal resides at Duluth; James P. is the subject of this review, and Louise married Arthur Kloth and resides at Seattle, Wash. James P. Boucher was reared on his father's farm and was educated in the public schools. When about sixteen years old he commenced an apprenticeship at the harness-making business with M. Frederick, at Prairie du Chien, and remained in the employ of that gentleman over two years. He then went to Postville, Ia., where he worked at his trade six months and then returned to Prairie du Chien, but after four months spent in the latter place he went to Muscoda, where he remained two years. Again returning to Prairie du Chien, he worked there at his trade about two years, after which he managed a shop at Spring Green for about the same length of time. In September, 1888, he purchased the shop which he still owns and conducts at Lone Rock. He has the only business of the kind in that thriving little village, and besides devoting his own time to the work he employs a harness maker, and makes a great many sets of harness. He has built up an excellent trade since opening the shop at Lone Rock, receiving patronage from the counties of Iowa, Sauk and Richland. Our subject was married on Aug. 29, 1899, to Miss Margaret A., daughter of Daniel and Bridget (Carroll) Darnan. Mrs. Boucher was born in Waldwict, Iowa county, Wis. Her parents were natives of Ireland and were married in Highland, Iowa county, in April, 1877. The father came to America and settled in Iowa county, where he entered land from the government and became an extensive real estate owner, possessing at one time 750 acres. His son, a half brother of Mrs. Boucher, and who was born to the first marriage of the father, now owns the place. The name of his brother is A. J. Carroll, and he is a prominent citizen of Iowa county. Upon coming to America the father first located at New Orleans, later removing to Iowa county, Wis., where he became prominent in local politics, serving nearly all of his life in offices in the town in which he resided. He was a stanch Democrat and very decided in his political views. He settled in Iowa county in 1846 and was considered a very successful man in the community. He died very suddenly on June 10, 1886, that date being his seventieth birthday anniversary, and previous to his death he had always been exceptionally strong and healthy. The mother now resides at Lone Rock with Mrs. Boucher, the latter being the eldest of three children born to the parents mentioned. The other two children are Catherine, who married George Evans and resides at Spring Green, Wis., and Mary R., who married R. M. DeLay and resides at Dixon, Neb. A son of the mother by a former marriage is named John McMahan, and he resides at Spring Green, Wis. to the union of Mr. and Mrs. Boucher there have been born two children - Victor, born Nov. 22, 1901, and William, born May 14, 1904. Our subject is a Republican in his political affiliations, and he has served six years as town trustee. Fraternally he is a member of the Beavers.
    HENRY A. BRACE, the efficient and obliging cashier of the Farmers' Bank at Lone Rock, was born in Herkimer county, N.Y., Aug. 18, 1863, and is the son of Curtis E. and Maria (Thomas) Brace, both of whom were born in the same county and state. Curtis E. Brace, the father, now resides with his son on section 23, in the town of Buena Vista, the farm being on sections 23 and 24. He was born in Herkimer county, N.Y., in 1831, and there his youth was spent, he being the son of Eleazer Brace, and the family being of old Empire State stock. He was married in the state of New York to Miss Maria Thomas, a native of the town of Columbia, in Herkimer county, the daughter of Henry Thomas, of a family belonging to the religious sect known as Friends or Quakers. Curtis E. Brace came with his family to Wisconsin in 1868, and settled in Bear Valley, where he has since resided, the family homestead now containing 283 acres of excellent land. Henry A. Brace is the only one living of four children who were born to the parents mentioned above, two brothers and a sister having died in infancy. The mother died in July, 1870, about two years after the family had located in Richland county. The subject of this review was reared in the town of Buena Vista and received his education in the public schools, after which he devoted his attention to farming, following that business exclusively for several years and still being largely interested in the same. Like most farmers in the Bear Valley region he and his father have been engaged in dairying to a considerable extent and they have a herd of the grade Holstein breed of cattle. They have given attention to the breeding of that excellent grade of stock during the past ten or fifteen years, and their herd at the present time numbers in the neighborhood of fifty. In 1899 Henry A. Brace and J. A. Black organized a private banking firm at Lone Rock, known as the Farmers' Bank, and in September, 1903, the institution was reorganized under the laws of Wisconsin, thus becoming a state bank, but retaining its former name. Our subject has been the cashier ever since the bank was first instituted, but Mr. Black has been succeeded as president by L. O. Brainard, who is given a more extensive mention on another page of this volume. The subject of this review was married on June 20, 1895, to Miss Fanny Ochsner, a daughter of Joseph Ochsner, deceased, who was an early settler in Bear Valley, where at one time he operated an extensive flouring mill. To the union of Henry A. Brace and wife there have been born two children; Charles C. and Donald O. Mr. Brace has taken but little interest in politics, further than to perform the duties of a good citizen, but he has served efficiently on the town board of Buena Vista.
    JAMES BRADY. More than half a century has elapsed since this venerable pioneer of Richland county took up his residence in Akan township, where he now maintains his home and where he has accumulated a large and valuable landed estate, having put forth herculean efforts in connection with the development of this section from the virgin forest to its present status of advanced civilization and material prosperity, and commanding the implicit confidence and esteem of the community where he has lived and labored to so goodly ends. Mr. Brady was born in Ireland, Aug. 1, 1823, and is thus an octogenarian at the time of this writing. In the fair Emerald Isle were also born his parents, Barnard and Mary (McDonald) Brady, and there the father passed his entire life, his death occurring in 1831. He was survived by ten of his twelve children, and in 1850 his widow, accompanied by all of these children, immigrated to America, landing in New York city, Sept. 29, 1850. There the mother's death occurred in 1854, and in the following year the subject of this sketch came to Wisconsin and numbered himself among the pioneers of Richland county. In June of that year he took up a tract of 160 acres of government land in Akan township, later adding to its area until he had 500 acres and he still retains a well improved estate of 300 acres. The greater portion of his land was reclaimed from the forest under his personal direction and much of the strenuous work involved fell upon his own sturdy shoulders. From the start his energies were not confined to forwarding his private interests alone, for he was always found ready to lend his aid and co-operation in carrying forward all public improvements and enterprises, assisting in the building of the early roads, in the establishing of schools and churches and taking an active interest in local political affairs. He is a man of strong mentality and mature judgment and he has achieved noteworthy success as a farmer and stock-grower, still maintaining a general supervision of his farm, though the heavier work of the same is now relegated to others, upon whose shoulders rests not the burden of so many years. He gained in precedence as a breeder of Durham cattle and also raises good horses and high-grade swine. In politics Mr. Brady is arrayed as a loyal supporter of the principles and politics of the Democratic party and he served six years each as township treasurer and clerk, was justice of the peace five years, chairman of the town board about twelve years, and for a time incumbent of the office of assessor. These various preferments vouch for the high regard in which he is held in the community and also testify to his executive ability. He and his family are communicants of St. Philip's Catholic church, of which he was one of the organizers, and of which he has been a liberal supporter and zealous member. In New York city, in 1853, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Brady to Miss Ann Tolmy, who was born and reared in Ireland and whose death occurred in 1860. Of the three children of this union one died in infancy and the other two, Katherine and Mary Ann, are still living, both being married and established in homes of their own. In 1867 Mr. Brady contracted a second marriage, being then united to Miss Mary Jane Hagerty, who was born in the state of New York. Of the nine children of this union three are deceased. Those living are James, Frank, Josephine, Margaret, Mary Ann, and Louisa. Frank has the active charge of his father's homestead farm. Mr. Brady is one of the sterling pioneers of the county and it is most consonant that at least this slight tribute should be accorded him in this history. He circulated, in 1867, the petition which resulted in the establishing of a postoffice in his neighborhood, and the same was named Brady's, in his honor. He served continuously as postmaster for thirty-five years, his first commission having been secured under the administration of President Johnson, and he held the position until the postoffice was abolished by reason of the establishing of the rural free mail delivery in this section.
    LENN O. BRAINARD, a popular merchant and banker at Lone Rock, was born in Herkimer county, N.Y., Oct. 30, 1850, the son of V. R. and Ellen (Reynolds) Brainard, both of whom were natives of the same place as their son. The Brainard family originally came from Haddam, Conn., and are of old New England stock. The father of the subject of this review came to Wisconsin in 1867 and settled in the Bear Valley section of Richland county, where he spent the remainder of his life. As a young man he had learned the trade of a carpenter, but after coming to Richland county he devoted his time exclusively to agricultural pursuits. L. O. Brainard is one of a family of seven children who were born to the parents mentioned above. John C., the eldest was a soldier in the Civil War and now resides at St. Andrews, in the state of Florida; L. O. is he to whom this review is more particularly dedicated; Charles C. is a resident of Lone Rock; Elizabeth married G. L. Carr and resides at Martin City, Mo.; Abbie married J. A. Carswell and resides at Gotham, B. F. has been for several years a practicing physician in Kansas City, Mo.; and Ada married Charles N. Smith. L. O. Brainard was about sixteen years old when his parents removed to Richland county, and he completed his education there in the public schools, also taking a course in the University of Wisconsin at Madison. He then taught school one year in Richland county, after which he entered the employ of the Wisconsin Central railroad in the engineering corps. After one year devoted to such occupation he returned to Bear Valley and followed farming two years, then spent one year near Norfolk, in Suffolk county, Va. He then again returned to Richland county and farmed until 1889, when he engaged in the milling business as proprietor of the Bear Valley mills, and he continued to operate the same until 1899, when he bought an interest in the general mercantile establishment of W. W. Ellsworth & Co., at Lone Rock, the firm name of which has since been changed to Ellsworth & Brainard. There was a private bank at that time in Lone Rock, owned by Messrs. Black & Brace, which was conducted under the name of the Farmers' Bank, but in 1902 the institution was incorporated under the laws of Wisconsin, retaining the old name, and Mr. Brainard became its president, in which position he has officiated since, and H. A. Brace is the efficient cashier. Mr. Brainard chose as his life companion Miss Louise Ochsner, of Bear Valley, a daughter of Joseph Ochsner, deceased, who was an early settler in that part of Richland county, where the mother of Mrs. Brainard now resides. To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Brainard there have been born two children, Harry D., who is a student in the Lone Rock schools, and Jean, who died in 1904, at the age of twelve years. The subject of this review has served as supervisor, and also has officiated on the village board of Lone Rock, several terms. Fraternally he is a member of the F. & A. M. lodge at Lone Rock, and also of the kindred order the Eastern Star.
    WILLIAM A. BREEDEN is an extensive dealer in flour, feed, groceries and grain, at Richland Center, and in the fifteen years that have elapsed since he first established the business it has grown to a magnitude far beyond his hopes and expectations. Mr. Breeden was born at Epsom, in the county of Surrey, England, fourteen miles southwest of London, on April 7, 1854, and he is the son of James and Sophia (Oliver) Breeden, both of whom were natives of England, the father being of Scotch descent. The father died in 1892 and the mother in 1893. The subject of this review is one of a family of ten children, nine of whom are living, that were born to the above named parents. He was reared in the mother country, educated in her national schools, and when a boy began his independent career by working as a clerk in a dry goods store. At the age of fourteen he went to London, where he obtained employment, and that city remained his place of residence until he migrated to America, three years later. In 1871 he came to the United States, with Richland Center as his objective point, and upon his arrival there he entered the employ of Parfrey & Pease, in the capacity of a miller, and he remained with that firm a continuous period of eighteen years. In 1891 he engaged independently in the business to which he has ever since given his attention, and his thorough equipment for that branch of the mercantile trade, couple with close attention to details and careful management, soon placed him among the successful men of affairs of Richland Center. Mr. Breeden was married in the city of London, on Sept. 18, 1871, to Miss Amelia Few, a native of the chapelry of Sydenham, England, the place in which was located the Crystal Place. Mr. And Mrs. Breeden are the parents of nine children, concerning whom the following facts are appropriately given as a part of this review: Emma is a resident of Seattle, Wash.; Amy married Frank Painter and resides in Richland Center; Edward is an engineer on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul railway, with headquarters at Madison; Alfred is in business with his father; May is a teacher in the Richland Center schools; Winnie resides at home; Harold is an operator on the Chicago & Northwestern railway, located at Appleton, Wis.; and Roy and Homer are in school. Mr. Breeden is a Prohibitionist in his political proclivities, and in the campaign of 1898 was the candidate of that party for representative in congress. He has served one term as alderman in the city council of Richland Center. At the present time he is a member of the library board, is one of the trustees of the Methodist Episcopal church, in which he and his family are communicants, and he is also steward of the church and assistant Sunday-school superintendent. Fraternally he is a member of the Masonic order, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Modern Woodmen of America, Mystic Workers, Beavers, Foresters, and Royal Americans.
    THOMAS BRENDEN is the leading merchant-tailor of Richland county, and as an evidence of the appreciation of his ability and skill in that branch of industry, his place of business at Richland Center is a central point for patrons of the tailoring art. Mr. Brenden was born near Christiania, Norway, on March 5, 1857, and he is one of a family of ten children, born to S. Brenden and Elizabeth Torgeson, both of the latter being natives of Norway, where they spent their lives, and are now deceased. The subject of this review was reared and educated in his native land, and at the age of fifteen years commenced to serve his apprenticeship at the tailoring business, which in that country continues throughout a period of seven years. He learned the trade in its entirety, including cutting, and when twenty-two years old, in 1879 he migrated to America and located at Avoca, in Iowa county, Wis. After remaining there two years, he worked in Janesville six months, and then removed to Richland Center, where he established a tailoring business and has conducted the same during all the years that have intervened. Mr. Brenden was married on April 10, 1882, to Miss Anna F. Larson, a native of Highland, Iowa county, Wis., and a daughter of Frederick and Gertrude (Wang) Larson, both of whom were born in Norway and became early settlers in Iowa county, locating there in the forties. The father went to California in 1849, and after remaining in the gold region about three years returned to Iowa county, where he still resides at the advanced age of eighty-one years, having reached that milestone on the journey of life, March 23, 1906. His wife died on Jan. 12, 1904 at the age of sixty-seven. Mr. Brenden is a Democrat in his political affiliations, and he has served as alderman in the city council of Richland Center for five years.
    JAMES BREWER, who is now engaged in the livery business in Richland Center, has passed the major portion of his life in this county and was long identified with agricultural pursuits. He is well known in the county and here has a wide circle of friends. Mr. Brewer has the distinction of being native of the city of London, England, and he comes of stanch old English stock in both the paternal and maternal lines. He was born May 29, 1851, and is a son of James and Charlotte (Atkins) Brewer, the former of whom was born in 1819 and the latter in 1820. Both rest in the cemetery at Richland Center, the father having died Feb. 20, 1873, and the mother having passed away June 6, 1894. The parents immigrated to America in 1853, when the subject of this sketch was about two years of age and they first located in the city of Cleveland, Ohio, where the father was employed in a packing establishment. He remained there until 1859, when he came as a pioneer to Richland county, Wisconsin, securing eighty acres of wild land, in Rockbridge township, and residing on the place from 1861 until his death. His widow thereafter remained on the old homestead until her death, many ears later, and the farm is now one of the well improved places of the township. Of the children of this worthy couple the following brief data are entered: James, subject of this sketch, was the first born; Mary, born Nov. 6, 1853, in England, is the wife of William F. Doudna, of Rockbridge township, and they have three children; Margaret, who was born in Cleveland, O., is the wife of Murry Washburn, of this county, and their only child died in infancy; Ned, who likewise was born in Cleveland, married Miss Hattie Dove and they have one child; Grover, who was born in Rockbridge township, this county, married Miss Hattie Joslin and they have seven children. All of the children remain residents of Richland county and the family is one held in high regard in the community. The subject of this sketch secured his rudimentary education in Cleveland, O., and after the removal of the family to Richland county he continued his studies in the district schools of Rockbridge township, where he was reared to maturity. He remained at the parental home until 1872, when he began working for himself, a few years later purchasing a farm in Rockbridge. He remained on this place until 1885, when he sold the property and took up his residence in Richland Center, and thereafter he was superintendent of a farm for N. L. James until 1887, when his first wife died. This caused him to break up housekeeping and he removed to Lavalle, Sauk county, where he remained nearly two years, in the meanwhile contracting a second marriage. He returned to Richland Center and shortly afterward repurchased his old farm, in Rockbridge township, a property which he still owns. He remained on the farm until 1901, when he rented a livery stable in Richland Center, where he has since continued in successful business, having a well equipped establishment and catering to a discriminating patronage. In politics Mr. Brewer is an independent Republican and he served one term as a member of the town board of Rockbridge. On Oct. 7, 1873, Mr. Brewer was united in marriage to Miss Lucy A. Washburn, daughter of Col. James and Maria E. (Jewett) Washburn, well known residents of Rockbridge township. Mrs. Brew was summoned tothe life eternal April 6, 1887, and is survived by two children: Alice, who was born July 20, 1874, is the wife of Edward Kintz, of Richland Center, and they have four children, Lucy, Mearl, Ruby and Elmer; Genevieve, who was born in 1886, lives with her uncle, Murry Washburn. On Feb. 9, 1889, Mr. Brewer wedded Miss Della M. Hawks, daughter of Charles and Eleanor (Weyman) Hawks, and she died Aug. 12, 1901, being survived by two children,--Charlotte, who was born Nov. 17, 1890, and Mildred, who was born Dec. 26, 1892. Mr. Brewer has an interesting heirloom in the form of a teacup, which has been handed down in his mother's family for several hundred years and which is said to have been one of the first manufactured in England, and he also has an ornate wooden-weight-bar of the sort utilized in England, for weighing money many years ago. The same is made of mulberry and his mother informed him that it was cut on the place where Shakespeare lived. The quaint device is handsomely carved and is highly prized by its present owner.
    WILLIS BRIGGS, one of the representative farmers of Eagle township and a member of the town board at the present time, claims Dane county, Wis., as the place of his nativity, and comes of stanch old New England stock. He was born June 4, 1861, and is a son of William and Mary Jane (Burington) Brings, both of whom were born and reared in Vermont. They came to Wisconsin in the pioneer days and settle in Dane county. In 1862, the year after the birth of the subject of this sketch, they came thence to Richland county and settled in the town of Eagle, where the father secured 220 acres of land, the greater portion of which he reclaimed from the wild state, developing a fine farm and erecting good buildings on the place. He finally retired from the farm and took up his residence in the village of Muscoda, just across the Wisconsin river, in Grant county, where he died April 1, 1900. His widow still survives him and is eighty-seven years of age, (1906.) They became the parents of three children, all of whom are living. The father was a prominent and influential citizen of Eagle, having served in all township offices except that of treasurer and having been chairman of the town board about fifteen years. He was a Democrat in his political affiliation and was identified with the Masonic fraternity and the Independent Order of Odd Fellow. His widow has long been a devoted member of the Methodist Episcopal church and she still resides in Muscoda. Willis Briggs was reared on the home farm and secured his education in the local schools. He has never wavered in his allegiance to the agricultural industry and is now the owner of a fine landed estate of 320 acres, devoted to general farming, stock-growing and dairying. In politics he clings to the faith of his honored father and is a stanch supporter of the cause of the Democracy, taking an active interest in public affairs of a local order and having been a member of the township board which has been his home from his infancy, and is known as an enterprising and progressive business man. In September, 1881, Mr. Briggs was united in marriage to Miss Mary Hardy, who was born in Eagle township, May 15, 1862, being a daughter of Thomas and Sarah Hardy, both of whom died here, having been early settlers of the township. Mr. And Mrs. Briggs have seven children, namely: Bertie, Buford, Roy, Verney and Vernel (twins), Bud, and Donald.
    DAVID F. BROWN is the owner of a well improved farm of 220 acres, in Sylvan township, and is one of the popular and well known citizens of Richland county, where he has lived from his boyhood days. He was born in Adams county, Ind., Apr. 22, 1860, and is a son of Henry and Elizabeth (Johnson) Brown, the former of whom was born in Pennsylvania and the latter in Ohio. The father died, in Rockbridge township, this county, May 27, 1905, and there his widow still resides, being sixty-four years of age (1906). Of their eight children the subject of this sketch is the eldest. Goerge M. is a farmer of Rockbridge township; Ellen is the wife of George Cunningham, of Vernon county; Susan is the wife of Joseph Smith, of Rockbridge township; Edward is a resident of Richland Center; Nana is the wife of Grant Satterley, of Dayton township; Sarah is the wife of Charles Hammond, of Henrietta township; and Homer remains with his widowed mother on the homestead. The family came to Wisconsin in 1869, and the father purchased 120 acres in Marshall township, this county, the tract being covered with heavy growth of timber. He had to make a clearing for his original dwelling, which was a primitive log house, and in course of time he cleared and place under cultivation the greater portion of this farm. In 1889 he sold this property and bought a small place a Sextonville, but one year later he purchased a residence in Richland Center, where he remained about two years, when he sold the property and purchased a well improved farm of 120 acres in Rockbridge township, where he passed the remainder of his life. He was a Democrat in his political proclivities and was a man who stood high in the regard of all who knew him. David F. Brown, whose name initiates this article, completed his early education in the common schools of Richland county and assisted in the reclamation of the home farm. He worked for his father until he had attained to his legal majority, and then was employed by the month at farm work one year. At the expiration of this period he married and soon afterward he purchased sixty-four acres of land in Rockbridge township, clearing the greater portion of the same and making other good improvements. He remained there engaged in farming until 1896, when he sold the property and purchased his present farm of 220 acres, in Sylvan township. Here he has erected a commodious and modern frame residence and also a new barn, and he gives his attention to mixed agriculture and to the raising of good grades of live stock. He is one of the stockholders in the cheese factory at Sabin, and furnishes a considerable amount of milk to the same, having a dairy herd of twenty cows. He also raises hogs and Norman horses. He is a man of broad and liberal views, uses much discrimination in the handling of the various details of his farming business and has gained success and prominence in his chosen field of endeavor. Mr. Brown is a supporter of the cause of the Prohibition party, and he has served three years as a member of the township board. He and his family hold membership in the Methodist Episcopal church at Mill Creek. In 1882 Mr. Brown was united in marriage to Miss Lurena Clark, who was born in Richland county, in 1865, being a daughter of George and Sarah (Van Deusen) Clark, both native of Ohio, where the former was born in January, 1842, being at present time a resident of Bloom township, this county. His wife was born in December, 1841, and her death occurred May 17, 1898. They came to Richland county from Ohio and first settled in Marshall township, where Mr. Clark cleared and otherwise improved a good farm, later removing to Bloom township. They became the parents of eight children, of whom five are living. Mr. and Mrs. Brown have five children: Louis, who was born July 11, 1884, married Miss Eva Ewers, and is a successful farmer of Sylvan Township; and the other four children remain at the parental home, Ida Alice having been born Feb. 10, 1887, Clark, Oct. 26, 1889; Sarah Elizabeth, Nov. 29, 1895; and Frank Russell, Oct. 30, 1898.
    WALTER BROWN, a prosperous and progressive farmer in the town of Buena Vista, whose success in life has been due to his own energy, intelligence and a determination to accomplish his purposes, was born in Wilkesbarre, Luzerne county, Pa., on Sept. 7, 1859. He is the son of William and Elizabeth (Tennant) Brown, both of whom were born at Hornby, near Lancaster, England. The parents were married in the mother country and soon thereafter migrated to Pennsylvania, where they remained until 1866, and then they came to Richland county and located at Lone Rock. One year later they removed to the town of Buena Vista and purchased a farm of 120 acres on the present site of the village of Gotham, where the father engaged in agricultural pursuits for a number of years. He later disposed of that place and lived for a time on the farm now occupied by Mrs. Atwood, but he has since removed to the town of Ithaca, which is the present place of his residence. His wife died in June, 1892. Walter Brown is the eldest of a family of four children who were born to these honored parents, the names and other facts concerning the two sisters and a brother being as follows: Anna married Charles Marks and resides at Twin Bluffs; Cora Elizabeth married Henry Niles and resides at Shell Lake, Wis.; and William T. is a resident of Twin Bluffs. The subject of this review was seven years old when his parents became residents of Richland county, and here he was reared, receiving his education in the public schools. He began his independent career at the age of twenty-one years by engaging in agricultural pursuits in the town of Buena Vista, on the place where August Friday now resides. He then operated a rented farm on Willow Creek, in the town of Ithaca, four years, after which he purchased 230 acres of land near Lone Rock, upon which he remained nine years. He then bought the place where he now resides, containing 120 acres, and has since successfully carried on a general farming and dairy business. Mr. Brown was married on March 14, 1880, to Mis Retta Cornelia Benway, a native of the state of Vermont, and to this union there have been born five children: George, the eldest, resides at home with his parents, Minnie Elizabeth is a resident of Freeport, Ill.; and Mary Alice, Chloe Belle, and Charles are still members of the parental family circle. In his political affiliations our subject has always been found in the ranks of the Republican party, and during the past four years he has officiated as treasurer of the town of Buena Vista. Fraternally he is a member of the I. O. O. F. lodge at Sextonville, and of the lodge of the Modern Woodmen of America at Gotham.
    NEHEMIAH BURNHAM, an old and highly respected farmer citizen of the town of Buena Vista, was born in the town of Washington, Litchfield county, Conn., on July 12, 1841, and he is the son of Arvin and Harriet (Patterson) Burnham, both of whom were natives of the "Nutmeg State," the father having been born at Hartford and the mother at Preston. The Burnham family is of English descent and settled in New England at a very early day. The parents of our subject came to Wisconsin in 1858 and settled at Sextonville, where the father purchased a farm and lived the remainder of his life, dying at the advanced age of eighty-four years. The mother died in 1880, aged seventy-seven years. In early life the father learned the trade of a marble cutter and he followed that occupation in Connecticut prior to taking up his residence in Wisconsin, but ever after he gave his undivided attention to the tilling to the soil, in which pursuit he was quite successful. Two children were born to these honored parents, he whose name introduces this biographical review, and a sister, Emma, who married Calvin Hall and formerly resided in the town of Willow Springs, Lafayette county, but since the death of her husband resides with her only son in Connecticut. Nehemiah Burnham received his early education in the state of his birth and he also attended school after the removal of his parents to Richland county. According to his memory, J. L. McKee and J. H. Miner are the only men now living in Richland Center who were residents of the county seat when our subject and his parents located in Richland county. Mr. Burnham commenced his independent career as a farmer near Sextonville and has always given an unwavering allegiance to the basic industry of agriculture. He purchased the place upon which he now resides in 1874, and it comprises 212 acres of very productive land. He carries on a general farming and dairy business. Mr. Burnham was married, Oct. 22, 1866, to Miss Hannah J. McNurlen, daughter of William and Willhelmina (Turmbeaux) McNurlen, who are given a more extended mention on another page of this volume in the sketch devoted to their son, William Allen McNurlen. Mrs. Burnham died on June 17, 1886, at the age of thirty-eight years, leaving six children, concerning whom the following facts are appropriately inserted herein: Emma, a graduate of the Sextonville high school and a successful teacher, died at the age of twenty-one years; Carrie married Henry Donnor and resides at Dayton, Green county, Wis.; Laura married Michael Shirk and resides in Washington, Conn.; George married Carrie Pierstorff, of the town of Buena Vista, has two children-Nona and Dorothy-and resides on the old homestead with his father; Charles is a barber at Gotham; and Frank is deceased. In his political views Mr. Burnham has always been a stanch Republican, and his worth as a citizen has been recognized by his compeers in the election to a position on the town board of Buena Vista, and he has also served as justice of the peace. He has strong religious and temperance principles, is a faithful member of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Gotham, and during its existence fraternized with the lodge of Good Templars at Sextonville.
    OLIVER J. BURNHAM is a member of the well known firm of Burnham & Scott, creamery, and butter and egg dealers of Richland Center, and he is one of the most highly respected and substantial citizens of the county in which he has made his home for the past thirty-five years. He was born in Addison county, Vt., Oct. 20, 1842, and is the eldest son of Wolcott H. and Lydia (Johnson) Burnham, the former of whom was a native of Vermont and the latter of New Hampshire. The names of the other children, who were born to the above named parents, are as follows: William A., who resides in south Dakota; Iola, a resident of the same state, and Pearlie, who was killed in a runaway at the age of six years. The father followed the occupation of an iron worker during his residence in Vermont, but after coming to Wisconsin he gave his entire attention to farming. In 1849, he joined the crowd of gold seekers and spent two years in the California fields. Returning then to his Green Mountain home, in 1855, he migrated with his family to Wisconsin and settled in Sauk county, where he followed farming until 1873 when he returned to California, dying there in 1886. The mother then resided in South Dakota with her son, William A., when she died, July, 1906. He is a prominent merchant and extensive land owner, also the president of a bank. Before going to south Dakota, William A. Burnham was engaged in business in Richland Center for five or six years. The subject of this review was educated in the public schools of his native state, and was but thirteen years old when the family migrated o Wisconsin. Two years later he began teaching in Sauk county, and pursued that occupation in that and also Richland county, farming during the summer seasons, until the outbreak of the Civil War. Then, on September 23, 1861, he enlisted at Lone Rock in the sixth battery, Wisconsin Light Artillery, and served with that command until discharged in 1864, at the expiration of his term of enlistment. After the surrender of Island No. 10, the battery was occupied in Garrison duty until May 17, 1862, when it was ordered to and took position in the advance of the forces investing Corinth. At the battle of Corinth, Oct. 4, 1862, the men were exposed on open ground without protection of any kind, and the casualties in the battery on that occasion were reported as five killed and twenty-one wounded. It took part in the sharp skirmish at Fort Gibson, also in the battle at Willow Springs, Raymond and Jackson and at Champion's Hill it did good service. It then took position in the trenched before Vicksburg, where it was constantly engaged in the duties of the siege until the surrender. It was then stationed at Memphis, Tenn., for a time, after which it was transferred to Chattanooga and in the movement n Missionary Ridge it had two guns in an important position. It also participated to some extent in the Atlanta campaign and on Oct. 10, 1864. Mr. Burnham was mustered out of the service. He then returned to his hme in Sauk county and resumed farming, which he followed until the fall of 1871, when, on account of ill health he again took up the occupation of a teacher. He served as principal of the high school at Lone Rock two years, and then changed his location to Richland Center, where he served in the same capacity in the schools of that place three years. He then engaged in the drug business at Richland Center, following that line of the mercantile trade until 1887, since which time he has been engaged in the produce business. The firm of Burnham & Scott buys and ships butter, eggs, poultry and cheese. Mr. Burnham is also interested in fruit growing and farming and has a fine farm of 450 acres adjoining the city limits of Richland Center, possessing among other attractive features one of the finest apple orchards in the county. The subject of this review was married on Sept. 20, 1870, to Miss Mary A. Strickland, a daughter of Judge Strickland, an old resident of Richland county, who settled therein in 1852. Mr. Strickland was born in Massachussetts, and resided in Ohio, and in 1852 was appointed judge for the judicial circuit, which occasioned his removal here. The maiden name of the mother of Mrs. Burnham was Martha Emma Brigden, a native of Ohio, and she was a niece of Senator Benjamin F. Wade. In politics Mr. Burnham has always affiliated with the Republican party, but he has never assayed the role of an office seeker, although he has served as mayor of Richland Center. Fraternally he is a member of the Masonic order and of the G. A. R.
    HENRY H. BUTTS is a venerable and highly respected pioneer citizen of Willow township and has resided on his present homestead farm for more than half a century, having reclaimed the same from the forest and being entitled to consideration as one of the upbuilders of the county, which he also represented as a loyal soldier of the Union in the Civil War. Mr. Butts was born in Lexington, Green county, N.Y., Sept. 4, 1822, and is a son of Riley Garrison Butts and Jane (Barr) Butts, the former of whom was born in Ireland and the latter in Green county, N.Y., where their marriage was solemnized. The father came to America as a young man and passed the remainder of his life in M.Y. state, where he operated a tannery at Edwardsville, Green county, and where he died when the subject of this sketch was but three years of age. His wife survived him by a number of years. They became the parents of three children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the second in order of birth. The firstborn was George Garrison, who died at the age of two years, and the third was George Riley, who now lives in the state of Kansas. Henry H. Butts was reared to maturity in his native state, where he received a common-school education, and where he was operator of a boat on the Erie canal for a period of seventeen years, at the expiration of which, in 1856, he disposed of his interests in the old Empire state and came to Richland county, Wis., and purchased his present homestead of eighty-four acres, in Willow township, where he has since resided continuously and where he has developed a valuable property through well directed effort and indefatigable industry, so that in his declining years he is in a position of independence and is able to enjoy the due rewards of former years of earnest endeavor. Dec 21, 1861, he enlisted as a private in Company M, First Wisconsin Regiment of volunteer calvary, in which he was promoted sergeant and with which he continued in active service until practically the close of the war, having been mustered out Feb 21, 1865. His command served principally in the Army of the West and though he took part in no heavy battles he participated in innumerable skirmishes and minor engagements. While in the army Mr. Butts was thrown from his horse and received injuries from which he has never fully recovered. His interest in is old comrades is signalized by his membership in the Grand Army of the Republic. He is an independent Democrat in his political proclivities and has ever stood ready to do all in his power to conserver the welfare and progress of his home county and state, though he has never sought political office. He and his wife hold membership in the Congregational church. June 1, 1848, Mr. Butts was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Scrafield, daughter of Robert Scrafield. She was born in England and was six years of age at the time of her parents' removal to America, the family locating in the state of New York, where she was reared and educated and where her marriage occurred. Mr. And Mrs. Butts have two children: Lucy J. is the wife of Erbin Richards and resided in the city of Grand Rapids Mich., and George R. is married and is a resident of Richland county.
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